It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.

Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.
Now, I need to number the paragraphs in this section without them being headings, and link the number to the above Heading 2., i.e. 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3..... or even 2.1.a, 2.1.b. ….. in order that I have the possibility to cross-reference them somewhere in the document. Obviously this section cannot have a Heading 3 in the event of using 2.1.1 etc, otherwise the numbering gets confused.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.
And what all did I forget to do? I forgot to go to 'Styles', 'Paragraph Styles', and I went, right click 'Redefine' because I've reverted to what it was before. So that's page numbering, we used A, B, C, D at the beginning. And we're going to use 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 for the rest of it. The only trouble happens, is when you go 'File', 'Print' now, and you're like, "Hmm." "I want to print pages." and you're not too sure. So what I have to do is go to A, through to 30. So it will include A, B, C, D, E, and all the way through the numbers. What if I just need A, B, or if I just print 1-30? It's going to skip out these first pages. That's just something to be aware of when you're printing, or making PDFs, that the page numbering is a little bit stranger now that we've gone and messed around with the page numbering.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
There are lots of options. For instance, you might reduce the amount of space between the number and the text by changing the Text indent at setting. Or, you might center the heading by choosing Center from the Number alignment dropdown. For even more options, click More to expose several more settings. You could use the Apply changes to option when setting level 1 to the I, II, III numbering style instead of changing it for each level.
I have set up a multi-level list but when I insert a lower level list within a higher level list (ie. 1,2,3,then a,b,c) the higher level list does not continue as expected after the lower level list (in this case “4” is what I would want) but rather continues as if the lower level list were part of the higher level list (in this case “7”). Does anyone know how to fix this?
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
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