A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
In the Adobe InDesign document I’m working on here we actually have two master pages, an ‘A’ master and a ‘B’ master so I’m going to select both the left and right hand page frames with the special character in on my ‘A’ master and go to Edit>Copy. I’m then going to double click on my ‘B’ master page and go to Edit>Paste in place. this will then copy the special character and position it in exactly the same place as it appears on my ‘A’ master.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
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So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
Thanks very much for your prompt reply, which reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read various Help topics, I suspected that I'd have to use an Excel data source for the numbers. Fortunately, my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag and drop facility to create automatic sequential numbering, so the data source creation was easy. In the end, it was the mail merge (no surprises?) which proved a tad tricky, but I got there in the end. I've used MM many times and quite happily in Word documents, but for Publisher label format, it was of course a bit different. The important bit that I had to discover for myself was the significance of, after getting to the Print stage, going into Print options, to Publication & Paper Settings, and selecting Multiple Pages per Sheet (& in my case, also "Single-sided" cos my default of duplex printing had come up). But TA-DA!  All is fine now. Thanks very much again.
@Aaron: I am stuck exactly with the same problem. I am constructing a style guide document, and thus my content is mainly images, not text. Still I do need numbered chapters in multiple levels, but the automatic numbering seems to be almost impossible as my headings are in separate text boxes. I have tried linking heading text areas, section markers, numbered lists and whatnot, but I am about to revert back to manual numbering instead of battling with this and wasting time! It’s just so devastating, I believe that machines should do what they do best, instead of people keeping track of numbering chapters!
To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog.

Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.


To create a running list—a list that is interrupted by other paragraphs or that spans multiple stories or documents—create a paragraph style and apply the style to paragraphs that you want to be part of the list. For example, to create a running list of the tables in your document, create a paragraph style called Tables, make a defined list part of the style, and then apply the Tables paragraph style to all paragraphs you want in your Table list.
Photograph of horn players taken at National Music Camp, Geelong Grammar, January 1993. I have no recollection of why all the horn players were wearing silly hats, but National Music Camp has a fine tradition of encouraging innocent pranks and general merriment—as well as damned hard work—so it's not entirely surprising. What's more puzzing is why I kept the photo all these years!

Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
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