In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.
In the Adobe InDesign document I’m working on here we actually have two master pages, an ‘A’ master and a ‘B’ master so I’m going to select both the left and right hand page frames with the special character in on my ‘A’ master and go to Edit>Copy. I’m then going to double click on my ‘B’ master page and go to Edit>Paste in place. this will then copy the special character and position it in exactly the same place as it appears on my ‘A’ master.
This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
Photograph of horn players taken at National Music Camp, Geelong Grammar, January 1993. I have no recollection of why all the horn players were wearing silly hats, but National Music Camp has a fine tradition of encouraging innocent pranks and general merriment—as well as damned hard work—so it's not entirely surprising. What's more puzzing is why I kept the photo all these years!
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.

It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!
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If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
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