All of this happens in the Bullets & Numbering dialog box, shown below. You will definitely want to use paragraph styles for this. My first one is called Chapter title. You will need to begin by changing the List Type to Numbers for all of the levels, and you must both name the List and use the same named list for all Levels. You do this by selecting the List > New List.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.

A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.
One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
Thanks for asking, but if you haven't done the Google search I suggested in post 1 of this thread and practiced with any of the tutorials at the linked resources there, or those recommended in posts 2 and 6, please do. Perhaps someone on the list will do the work you're requesting. As a trainer I feel my best value is to offer paths to solutions so folks can learn to use the tools. Some tools require more practice, but those are the ones that give the most pleasure of discovery at the "Aha!" moment that comes when one "gets it."
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
One of the last things we need to do is our Table of Contents. We did this earlier, where we had different page numbering. So, all we need to do now is, because we've redefined all our Styles, and we're doing it all proper now, if we go to 'Layout'-- I've got my cursor flashing in here, first of all go to 'Layout', let's go to 'Update Table of Contents', and I'm going to click 'OK'. There's some spaces left in the front of this when I was messing around with it before, yours should be fine. So it's updated to the correct numbers. One thing I also did was I went in and adjusted the font from Medium to Light because I just liked it. I did that in between tutorials.

Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
When the “Current Page Number” placeholder sits on a master page, every page to which you assigned that specific master page will display this variable – the number will change automatically on every page. If you change the style assigned to the placeholder on the master page (let’s say you set it to bold), all page numbers will update to that style (all numbers will become bold).

I have set up a multi-level list but when I insert a lower level list within a higher level list (ie. 1,2,3,then a,b,c) the higher level list does not continue as expected after the lower level list (in this case “4” is what I would want) but rather continues as if the lower level list were part of the higher level list (in this case “7”). Does anyone know how to fix this?
Help! Having a problem. I realize this is for CS5, which may be the issue. I’m working in CS6, and when I do this, it changes page 1 to a right-side page, completely affecting all of the spreads. I’ve tried to go into Document Setup to force it back, but it ends up making TWO right side pages for the first two pages! Perhaps a difference in versions, or maybe a bug?
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.

×