To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.

You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.


There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Numbering in Word is a bit of a nightmare at times and if you need multi-level numbering this could cause you much stress if you rely on the mouse alone. Using the keyboard to some degree makes this task very simple. I will explain how to create a multi-levelled numbered list and ask you to keep all the default formatting that Word gives you. This can be changed and modified but sometimes it messes up your layout. I advise to use what is there until you have the times and patience to master its intricacies.
In a legal document, it's rare for every paragraph in the document to be numbered. Usually, you change between numbered paragraphs and non-numbered (plain) paragraphs of text. When Word sees you switching between these types of formats, it usually tries to help by restarting your numbered list back at "1" (or the first value of your list, such as "A"). There are a few different ways to make the number follow the last number of your paragraphs. In Word, this is called Continue from Previous List.

Notice that the Font option (when you applied italics) changes only the number, not the heading text. To update the heading text, modify the heading style as you normally would. Word assumes you want all Heading 1 and Heading 2 styles included in the new numbering scheme. If you want to omit a heading level from the scheme, don't use a built-in heading style to format those headings.
Thanks Javad. That sounds like a very interesting document! So, one part has the binding on the left like normal, and one part has the binding on the right, is this correct? It is possible to re-start the numbering of the page numbers, however the binding swapping might be a more interesting challenge. I would take the easy way out and just create two separate documents, then combine them afterwards!
You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
First thing we need to do, is we need to jump to page 1. So double click page 1, so we know we're on it. Right click page no.1, and we need to go to this option that says 'Numbering & Section Options'. Click on him. And what we do is, we say, I want to switch it from style 1, 2, 3 to A, B, C. Actually you pick any of these in here. It's really typical to use A, B, C, but you can use any of these other numbers, just click 'OK'. You'll notice that A, B, C, D, E is being replaced out. Now what we want to do is go to our first page that we want. In our case it's E. So I don't want this. Let's get rid of our Spreads. I don't want page 1, page C, or B. I don't want this to be page1, I want this to be page 1. So I'm going to double click page E. Right click it, go to 'Numbering & Sectioning'. And just say, I'd like to start at page no. 1 using this format. Click 'OK'. What will happen is, you can see, page 1 starts here, 2, 3, 4. You see, the numbering starts here as well. All the way through, to the end of our document.
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I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Help! Having a problem. I realize this is for CS5, which may be the issue. I’m working in CS6, and when I do this, it changes page 1 to a right-side page, completely affecting all of the spreads. I’ve tried to go into Document Setup to force it back, but it ends up making TWO right side pages for the first two pages! Perhaps a difference in versions, or maybe a bug?
Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.

Photograph of horn players taken at National Music Camp, Geelong Grammar, January 1993. I have no recollection of why all the horn players were wearing silly hats, but National Music Camp has a fine tradition of encouraging innocent pranks and general merriment—as well as damned hard work—so it's not entirely surprising. What's more puzzing is why I kept the photo all these years!
Thanks Javad. That sounds like a very interesting document! So, one part has the binding on the left like normal, and one part has the binding on the right, is this correct? It is possible to re-start the numbering of the page numbers, however the binding swapping might be a more interesting challenge. I would take the easy way out and just create two separate documents, then combine them afterwards!
There are lots of options. For instance, you might reduce the amount of space between the number and the text by changing the Text indent at setting. Or, you might center the heading by choosing Center from the Number alignment dropdown. For even more options, click More to expose several more settings. You could use the Apply changes to option when setting level 1 to the I, II, III numbering style instead of changing it for each level.

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Krystyna has been an IT Trainer for over 22 years; she has trained Microsoft products since their 1st release, as well as other packages from other companies such as Oracle, Adobe, Lotus and Corel. She has trained a varied audience from University students to Managing Directors, in one to ones, small groups to over 50 in a lecture environment. Her experience of industries covers a wide spectrum from Utilities, MOD, Advertising, Medical, Police, Cosmetics, IT and Financial.


Almost everything I learned about Word's numbering I learned from the Word newsgroups (especially the Microsoft Word Numbering newsgroup) and from the MS Word MVP FAQ site. The contributions of John McGhie (especially his article about Word's Numbering Explained on the MS Word MVP FAQ site) and Dave Rado are significant. The current page represents a mere summary and application of some of that work.
When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.

My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
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