Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.
The creator of ShaunaKelly.com, Shauna Kelly, passed away peacefully on Wednesday November 16, 2011 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. If you are requesting permission to re-use any information on this site, then you may do so with appropriate acknowledgement of her work. If her words, thoughts or pictures have helped you, or made money for you, then please consider making a donation in her name to the Women's Cancer Foundation.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
So now on the A master page in your Adobe InDesign document you should have a capital A in the text frame that we created. This is more than just a capital A though, this represents the A master in your Adobe Indesign document and it means that on every page that is attached to your A master the corresponding page number will appear in that position on your page.

When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.


If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
@Aaron: I am stuck exactly with the same problem. I am constructing a style guide document, and thus my content is mainly images, not text. Still I do need numbered chapters in multiple levels, but the automatic numbering seems to be almost impossible as my headings are in separate text boxes. I have tried linking heading text areas, section markers, numbered lists and whatnot, but I am about to revert back to manual numbering instead of battling with this and wasting time! It’s just so devastating, I believe that machines should do what they do best, instead of people keeping track of numbering chapters!

While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
Over the last few months, we've reviewed Word's numbered list features. Specifically, How to control spacing and alignment in a numbered list in Microsoft Word shows how to control spacing and alignment and How to number headings in a Word 2016 document shows a simple way to number headings. In this article, we'll continue by reviewing Word's Multilevel List feature. Fortunately, it's easier to implement and modify than you might think.
If you want to use a bullet found in a specific font (such as the pointing hand from Dingbats), be sure to set the bullet to remember that font. If you use a basic bullet character, it’s probably best not to remember the font, because most fonts have their own version of that bullet character. Depending on whether you select the Remember Font With Bullet option, a bullet you add can reference either a Unicode value and a specific font family and style, or just a Unicode value.
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.

A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
One of the harder things to do in Adobe InDesign, surprisingly for a page layout tool, is to create multilevel or outline format numbered lists.  The right way to accomplish this, according to the folks at Adobe, is to create a Style for every level of the list you’d like to have! Here are Adobe’s instructions on how to do so (This content is taken directly from https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/bullets-numbering.html#create_multi_level_lists):
The software Classic Menu for Office is designed for the people who are accustomed to the old interface of Microsoft Office 2003, XP (2002) and 2000. It brings back the classic menus and toolbars to Microsoft Office (includes Word) 2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016. The classic view helps the people to smoothly upgrade to the latest version of Office, and work with Office 2007/2010/2013/2016 as if it were Office 2003 (and 2002, 2000).
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.

You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
@Aaron: I am stuck exactly with the same problem. I am constructing a style guide document, and thus my content is mainly images, not text. Still I do need numbered chapters in multiple levels, but the automatic numbering seems to be almost impossible as my headings are in separate text boxes. I have tried linking heading text areas, section markers, numbered lists and whatnot, but I am about to revert back to manual numbering instead of battling with this and wasting time! It’s just so devastating, I believe that machines should do what they do best, instead of people keeping track of numbering chapters!

A List Style stores the information about how to number each level. That includes the format of the number ( "1" or "a" or "i"), whether the number is preceded by text (eg "Chapter 1" or "Part A"), whether the number includes previous levels' numbers (eg paragraph 1.4.3), and the indents (the distance from margin to number and from number to text).

When you're working on a document such as a magazine or a book with many pages in it, using the master page feature in Adobe InDesign CC 2015 to insert automatic page numbering simplifies working with the document. On a master page, you designate the position, font, and size of the page numbers and any additional text you want to accompany the numbers such as the magazine name, date or the word "Page." Then that information appears on every page of the document along with the correct page number. As you work, you can add and remove pages or rearrange entire sections, and the numbers remain accurate.
In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
It works from within Corel Draw and eliminates the need to export graphics and then import them into sign making software. In fact SignTools 4 turns Corel Draw into arguably the best sign program currently available. SignTools 4 is a floating application that works from within Corel Draw 10, 11, 12, X3, X4, X5, X6, X7*,X8 and 2017. It can be moved to any part of the screen and also contains a customizable Quick Palette, allowing users to setup the program with their most used tools. The Quick Palette makes using the tools faster than ever before. You can even click on the 'Auto' option allowing you to use tools with a single click.
Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
Whats happening is that the first set of NUMBERING (including sub numbering) i.e for 1.0 HEADING 1 is coming PERFECTLY as numbered. I hit "enter" at any level of numbering, word automatically puts the next number below that number. However for the rest of the headings such as 2.0 and 3.0, where there should be 2.1 there is 1.1, where there should be 2.2, its 1.2 and so on and so forth. Same for 3.0 and its numbering subsets.
Roger Wambolt, senior product trainer at Corel, eases in with an exploration of the interface and touches on the major players in the toolbox: the Pick, Shape, Crop, Curve, and Interactive tools. Then, once you know how to draw simple lines and shapes, he shows how to group, copy, and adjust objects on your document page. Plus, learn about working with text, using the new Font Manager and the extensive library of fonts in CorelDRAW, adding and editing images, automating tasks with scripts and macros, creating color palettes, and preparing your CorelDRAW projects for print. Roger closes with some tips on customizing the CorelDRAW interface to be more productive and create your designs in fewer steps.
The above steps are the most basic way to add a very basic page number, but if you follow a few tricks then you could save yourself even more time and get the job done even faster. For one thing, the page number you’ve added is only for one page, and if you used that method you’d spend ages adding page numbers to the whole document. To add page numbers to all pages quickly and format them all equally, follow these steps:

First thing we need to do, is we need to jump to page 1. So double click page 1, so we know we're on it. Right click page no.1, and we need to go to this option that says 'Numbering & Section Options'. Click on him. And what we do is, we say, I want to switch it from style 1, 2, 3 to A, B, C. Actually you pick any of these in here. It's really typical to use A, B, C, but you can use any of these other numbers, just click 'OK'. You'll notice that A, B, C, D, E is being replaced out. Now what we want to do is go to our first page that we want. In our case it's E. So I don't want this. Let's get rid of our Spreads. I don't want page 1, page C, or B. I don't want this to be page1, I want this to be page 1. So I'm going to double click page E. Right click it, go to 'Numbering & Sectioning'. And just say, I'd like to start at page no. 1 using this format. Click 'OK'. What will happen is, you can see, page 1 starts here, 2, 3, 4. You see, the numbering starts here as well. All the way through, to the end of our document.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
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