* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?


InDesign allows you to add a page number marker to a master page within the document. The master page functions as a template for every page it's applied to, so the consecutive page numbers appear on every page. InDesign updates the page number automatically as you insert, delete and move pages. To add a page number marker to a master page, create a text box on the master page by going to the Type menu and choosing "Insert Special Character," "Markers" and then "Current Page Number."

I need a way for the priority level to automatically adjust when I add or change an item with a new priority level. I might have 6 tasks, each will have a different priority. If I add one and set it to 1, the others need to increment + by one digit. Adding one to the above the highest would see no change in the others. Adding one in the middle would spread the rest apart (e.g. I have a 3, I put a new record and put it at 3, the old 3 becomes 4, and so on (everything below it would increment one digit).
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
I am curently working on a larger projekt, where we have aprox. 4500 pcs.of furnituer designed in 4 different kind of families, generic, furnituer, furnituer systems and specialty equipment. We need to be able to asign every  pcs.of funituer a seqventual serial number, we have tried to do this using an extension with a funktion called element positionerning, but we have had no success with this tool, apparently it is taking up to much memory.
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
Thank you for these instructions!! I’m using them to auto number my son’s baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I’m using Word on a PC. Thanks!!
Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
One other thought. It may not hurt to make option 1 a logical expresssion where it will update the number IF a number other than 0 already exists for it. This will prevent it from giving a new number if you go back, edit it and save it. I accomplished this by adding the following (roughly): If PONo=0 Then My.PONo…. (Expression and save command) Else (Save Command)
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.

Hi Maria, there is a way for your endnote numbering to restart at 1 for each chapter when all your chapters are in a single document. You’re right that they revert to Continuous when imported into InDesign, but you can change your Endnote Options to restart the numbering at the beginning of each Story (a story is a set of linked text frames) and then divide your chapters into stories. Here’s what to do:
Hi Nick, unfortunately InDesign CC2018 doesn’t support live endnotes when using the Book feature. So if your chapters are in separate documents and you’re trying to add the endnotes to your back matter (in another separate document), live endnotes won’t work. I think that’s why your reference numbers are disappearing. The live endnote feature doesn’t work across documents, only within one document, so you’ll need to place the endnotes at the end of each document to keep them live.
Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
One other thought. It may not hurt to make option 1 a logical expresssion where it will update the number IF a number other than 0 already exists for it. This will prevent it from giving a new number if you go back, edit it and save it. I accomplished this by adding the following (roughly): If PONo=0 Then My.PONo…. (Expression and save command) Else (Save Command)
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
we have printed AP checks using the check number from 0000000001 to 0000000006, but we havent posted those batches. we have only one checbook. Now can we restart the check number from 000001. Then do we need to delete the previous batches for checks printed. What is the best approach in this regard. Thanks in Advance, Arun. In the Post Payables Checks batch window (Transactions > Purchasing > Post Checks), choose the batch in question, then select Reprint Checks from the drop-down list. Enter 000001 for your starting check number. You will also need to go ...
Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.
Can anyone tell me what the maximum no. of worksheets is in Excel? Ton From Help...Limited by available memory (default is 3) -- HTH Nick Hodge Microsoft MVP - Excel Southampton, England nick_hodgeTAKETHISOUT@zen.co.uk.ANDTHIS "Ton" wrote in message news:EB5EE739-9250-4D83-AA7C-EE82C02C0AA3@microsoft.com... > Can anyone tell me what the maximum no. of worksheets is in Excel? The maximum number only depends on the amount of memory available. -- Best Regards Leo Heuser Followup to newsgroup only please. "Ton"
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.

Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.


Using this script… no. While I use the data merge feature of InDesign often, I avoid the “multiple records” feature, but I typically prepare one record on one page, output the resulting file to PDF and then let the imposing software take care of the page imposition. If page imposition software is something that you don’t have, there is an alternate technique that requires preparing one record on a page, and then using the multipageimporter2.5 script to import them onto a larger sheet. Here is the link to that article: http://colecandoo.com/2011/10/28/theres-more-than-one-way-to-cut-and-stack/
Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
This will work OK for a small set of data, but the more data there is, the more intensive the subquery becomes, and it must be called repeatedly for each row. This is one of those rare cases where doing it in VBA is faster than doing it in SQL — after all, row numbering is fundamentally iterative, not set-based which just goes against the grain of what SQL was designed to do – solve a problem in a set-based fashion, non-iterative fashion.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
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