I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
Despite its difficulties and drawbacks Word's automatic numbering can be harnessed. The best method I have seen for doing that is with outline numbering as explained by MVP Shauna Kelly in: Outline numbering in Microsoft Word. This takes a good bit of work to get it set-up, but if you get it set up in a template it is well worth the effort and most of your automatic paragraph numbering issues will be resolved.
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.

Budget is our income and sometimes this is positive. I need to make this column in a query all negitive values. I am using the IIf function but it is not working. Budget: [budget_amount] IIf ([budget_amount] >=0, [budget_amount]*-1, [budget_amount]) or is there another function I could use? On Mon, 29 Oct 2007 19:18:00 -0700, Tamm Fox wrote: > Budget is our income and sometimes this is positive. I need to make this > column in a query all negitive values. > > I am using the IIf function but it is not working. > > Budget: [budget_amount] IIf ([budget_amount] &g...

A quick search at the top using the term “document numbering” shows 46 different threads, with very good advice, for the most part.  I would first recommend you perform the same search and see what advice may be gleaned from those far older and wiser than myself.  In order to directly answer your question, I would refer you to the following discussion thread.  Many talk about the physical numbering system to use, which is important, and many discuss the frustration that a new person to the position feels when they inherit a mess from someone else and wish to clean it up. 
Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.
Yes, I’m a little confused by your brief too. The script that I describe here will create an array of numbers using any step value that it offers, including by 1 number each time. Whether you put the resulting list directly into InDesign as text, or indirectly using the Data Merge feature is up to you. Perhaps learn more about the Data Merge feature of InDesign itself – David Blatner has a great series on Lynda.com that will explain Data Merge much more than I can on this thread.
The last option that we’ll present for assigning invoice numbers is according to project number. This is most useful for companies that take on projects where that number is the most important reference for the work. These invoice numbers will include the project number, customer number, and sequence number, with the sequence number at the end. An invoice numbering system organized by project could either begin with the customer number:
Design your ticket, use excel or libre's version and create the numbers. Save those numbers as text, I always make the first one xxx then 001 and so on, xxx will be the master page. Use data merge from Indesign to create the master ticket, you will need to make a text box for the number. Once it looks good to you draw a text box around the whole ticket. At the bottom of the data merge tab is a button that gives you the options how you want your layout, columns or rows, etc. even has a preview. once you click create it will create another file with all your tickets sequentially numbered. It'll be a couple of hours before I'm at work but can post the link I used to create these for the first couple of times.
i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.

I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.

Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.


Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
I am trying to create a macro for outlook 2016 appointments that would add a number sequentially each time the appointment template was opened. I need to run this under public user so as others open it will give next number. Thank you in adance here is form Sequential Number Here Outside Assignment #: Click here to enter text. Court Reporter Needed: Click here to enter text. Job Type: Click here to enter text. Referral: Click here to enter text. Assignment Date: Click here to enter a date. Contact: Click here to enter text. Time: Click here to enter text.… Read more »
Hi Tara, Thanks for sharing your observations! I agree that breaking your chapters into separate text frames is not the ideal way to go, but is only useful if you must have live endnotes at the end of each chapter rather than at the back of the book. One alternative in this scenario is to create a separate InDesign document for each chapter, then use the Book feature to tie them all together. Whether your chapters are in separate text frames or in separate documents, you’ll still need to be very vigilant with any changes to the flow of text to make sure the pagination is okay.
I thought I'd try and just create one decal and use the print merge feature but I don't print from my workstation. I create the design in X7 then export it to a RIP Station for print. I thought I'd just do the print merge and print as pdf just to get the numbers without typing them. That gets me all the numbers in sequence but all on 500 separate pages.
Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
×