GREAT tip with lots of uses! Thank you. This will save me hours of work on some tickets I’m designing. However, I also need to set up table tents that have numbers on them. They’re 2-up, and are folded, so each number needs to appear twice on the same page. In short, I want a page with 1/1 and 2/2, and I’m getting 1/2 and 3/4. Am I missing an obvious fix? Thank you.

When you’ve finished typesetting your book, you’ll create an appropriate page or pages in the back matter for your endnotes. When you have a spot ready to go, find your endnotes text frame (it might still be on the pasteboard of page 2 or 4), and cut-and-paste it to the appropriate page in your back matter. Note that the endnotes text frame can be copied- or cut-and-pasted without losing any live links. Isn’t technology grand?


I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.

Joshua, I described this problem in my post #5 — the footnote settings are doc-global. I know no present solution to your problem — which is why we still need Adobe to code a counter! And we also need to be able to set up footnotes which are frame-wide, not just column-wide. And, natch, we need headings which are frame-wide, spanning multiple columns — so the ID engineers can’t retire quite yet. :-)

In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Version numbers are used in practical terms by the consumer, or client, to identify or compare their copy of the software product against another copy, such as the newest version released by the developer. For the programmer or company, versioning is often used on a revision-by-revision basis, where individual parts of the software are compared and contrasted with newer or older revisions of those same parts, often in a collaborative version control system.

Version numbers are used in practical terms by the consumer, or client, to identify or compare their copy of the software product against another copy, such as the newest version released by the developer. For the programmer or company, versioning is often used on a revision-by-revision basis, where individual parts of the software are compared and contrasted with newer or older revisions of those same parts, often in a collaborative version control system.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Joshua, I described this problem in my post #5 — the footnote settings are doc-global. I know no present solution to your problem — which is why we still need Adobe to code a counter! And we also need to be able to set up footnotes which are frame-wide, not just column-wide. And, natch, we need headings which are frame-wide, spanning multiple columns — so the ID engineers can’t retire quite yet. :-)
Add numbers by inserting the same identifier at another location. Alternatively, copy the first one, select it and press “F9” to update the display. As a third option, you can use the keyboard shortcut “Ctrl-F9” and type “SEQ” and your identifier between the braces that appear. For instance, insert “{SEQ mynum}.” Press “F9” to update the field and enable the number to display.

One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Open your Endnote Options dialog box by clicking Type>Endnote Options. In the Numbering section change the Mode drop-down box from Continuous to Restart Every Story, and in the Positioning Options section change the Scope drop-down box from Document to Story. Next you’ll need to separate your chapters into stories. Assuming that all the text frames in your document are currently linked, you’ll need to unlink them between chapters. Use the StorySplitter script to do this, and you can read how to do it here on InDesign Secrets.
With this expression we check only for records that are in the same year as the Inquiry date to increment the sequence. Again, the NZ function will automatically restart the sequence with each year. Cleary, though, we cannot generate this number until the InquiryDate has been entered. Is this value is a user entry, then you may want to check that it’s filled in before generating the number. Something like:
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
Perhaps your explanation already addresses this, but I can’t see it. Is there any way this script can be used for printing multiple-up in numeric sequence? For example, if I’m running 1000 postcards 4-up (on 250 sheets). I need the 4 cards on page 1 to be numbered 1, 251, 501, 751; then the 4 cards on page 2 numbered 2, 252, 502, 752; etc., so that when the sheets come out of the printer and are cut into 4, I have a stack of 1-250, a stack of 251-500, a stack of 501-750 and a stack of 751-1000.
Thank you for your reply.  It reassured me that I was on the right path. From having read other Help texts, I guessed that I would have to use good ole mail-merge and set up a numbers list in Excel. Luckily my knowledge of Excel was good enough to know about the drag&drop for sequential immediate numbering. When it came to the crunch, it was this particular type of mail merge which gave me a bit of initial difficulty. Despite my having used it happily and often in Word, for labels in Publisher, it was - not surprisingly - different in certain respects; principally the crucial point of the Print stage, which necessitated finding the option Publications & Paper Settings, and selecting 2 specific parameters, namely (1) Multiple pages per sheet,  (2) Single-sided printing (my default double printing had appeared). Once I'd sussed this, it was plain sailing.  Thanks again.
One of the best ways to prevent invoice numbering errors is by running a monitoring tool that constantly checks for duplicates and so helps you catch errors before their invoices are finalized. If you use the sequencing system provided by your accounting software, the issue of duplicate or missing invoice numbers is avoided entirely – if not, and an error does occur, your software should have a tool to help you locate and solve it.

Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.


Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.
Developing Document Control and Image Numbering Systems. The document and imaging numbering or coding system for your application gives you control over the documents. If you are going to image documents, the document database record number and the image record or file number may be the same number. A document and imaging numbering or coding system can be very simple or sophisticated, depending upon your desires and the needs of a particular case. Below are three possible methods of coding your documents and images:
In XP- Select all the images you want numbered. Right click the 1st one and select rename Name the image and type a number you wish to start with in brackets ( )immediately after the nameClick on the 1st image and all your images will be numbered sequentially. If you want to use more images later in this way you can follow on with the next number to have a continuing sequence.

It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps! sequentially numbering
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