For years, I've applied an autonumbered style to the first cell I want to be sequentially numbered. When I add rows, the cells immediately below continue that same numbered style whether I add them by tabbing from the end of the last row or by using the commands to inserts rows above or below. Because the numbering is part of a style, it can continue from one table to another, but it can always be restarted. I can even skip a row by changing the style for the particular cell or by just toggling off the numbering. I also use it to show two levels of numbering in a single cell by creating two autonumbered styles in a hierarchy that works just like Heading 1 and Heading 2.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.

I make the design with as many up as I need on the master page, linking the frames where the numbers will go. Then I make the list using Excel, copy paste to ID and apply a paragraph style with "start in next frame" option. Click the outbox on the pasted text to get a loaded cursor and delete the frame. Then just shift-click over the first textframe on a live page to have as many "tickets" added as needed automatically.

If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.

When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Add numbers by inserting the same identifier at another location. Alternatively, copy the first one, select it and press “F9” to update the display. As a third option, you can use the keyboard shortcut “Ctrl-F9” and type “SEQ” and your identifier between the braces that appear. For instance, insert “{SEQ mynum}.” Press “F9” to update the field and enable the number to display.

i’ve had to do tons of this lately and found that for the amounts of tickets being done (e.g. 7000 x 10 tickets + cover & mailer) that chuckT’s solution almost 2 years ago is similar to what i use. would be interested to know if others doing similar VDP are using a wholly indesign/excel solution, or if specific VDP software such as XMPie are being used.


I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
First, you have to use YOUR field and control names. The ones I use are samples. The error you are getting indicated you do not have a control named txtProject. So you have to substitute the correct name of the control. bound to the ProjectID field. By the way it is not a good idea to the octothorpe(#) as part of a field name. A controlname may be different from a fieldname. The name property of a control is on the Other tab in the Properties dialog.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.
The problem with breaking up chapters into separate stories is, then, when I go to export the book to ePUB, the entire book is no longer in one, continuous stream, so it will not export properly. Also, if there are any edits down the road, and there is text reflow, having chapters in separate stories opens up a HUGE can of worms for pagination! Any ideas?

I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks....


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OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.

First, you have to use YOUR field and control names. The ones I use are samples. The error you are getting indicated you do not have a control named txtProject. So you have to substitute the correct name of the control. bound to the ProjectID field. By the way it is not a good idea to the octothorpe(#) as part of a field name. A controlname may be different from a fieldname. The name property of a control is on the Other tab in the Properties dialog.
InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.
Select the Text Tool (T) and start dragging a text box that will wrap around the whole ticket including the crop marks. This is very important since the Data Merge will automatically calculate the duplication. Then open up the Text Frame Option (Command + B) and set the Inset spacing to 1p4 for the top and 1p8 for the left. Of course, you can place the text for the numbers anywhere you like. I set the numbers to a small text.
The values for Number position (here called Aligned at), Text indent and Follow number with are in the Position section at the bottom. With multi-level numbering, you also have easy access to settings that control the type of numbering at each level, the characters before and after each level’s numbers (period versus parenthesis), and the list number style (1, a, I, etc.).

Another issue with the part-numbering format is part number designation. Some systems associate a part number with a particular part type. For example, 10xxx indicates a procedure, 20xxx indicates a drawing, PLxxx indicates a policy-level document, and so on. An alternative approach to part numbering is a “no designation” system, where parts are given sequential unique numbers within a specified format, regardless of their type, material, application or other attributes. After all, isn’t the part title the best designator?
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.

An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
Typically the second option of saving as a CSV file is the one to choose for use with Data Merge. Click the create button to choose a file name and location, make sure that a header has been assigned and click OK. This creates the CSV file that contains the sequential numbers that can then be used in a Data Merge by opening the Data Merge palette, clicking the flyout and clicking Select Data Source…
The problem with breaking up chapters into separate stories is, then, when I go to export the book to ePUB, the entire book is no longer in one, continuous stream, so it will not export properly. Also, if there are any edits down the road, and there is text reflow, having chapters in separate stories opens up a HUGE can of worms for pagination! Any ideas?
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
I have been generating 150-400 page reports with multiple lists in tables. Word's auto numbering would only go so far in applying sequential numbering but then it just stops and I could not use it any more. I had to manually type in the numbered list which was quite annoying and very time consuming. Then I came across your Word Tip. Awesome! It worked. Thanks so very much.
I removed the required setting on the table level. The form does not give me an error message now, but does not close on its on. I closed it via a command then looked at the Design Projects table to see if the new record, #896, shows up. A new record is there, with all the entered data EXCEPT the very important field of the Project ID. That field is blank.
You can change the numbers in the list by restarting the sequence or by specifying a new start number. You can change the list's style. You can do anything to this list that you can do to a normal numbered list because it is a numbered list, with one exception: the list, while easy to format, is fixed. If you delete an item, the list updates accordingly, but I haven't found a way to add numbers.
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