Add numbers by inserting the same identifier at another location. Alternatively, copy the first one, select it and press “F9” to update the display. As a third option, you can use the keyboard shortcut “Ctrl-F9” and type “SEQ” and your identifier between the braces that appear. For instance, insert “{SEQ mynum}.” Press “F9” to update the field and enable the number to display.
The best way to do this is to use a primary key. In cases where a query is complex and joins several tables, we may need to use the primary key of the table that’s on the bottom of the relationship hierarchy or possible a concatenation of multiple tables’ unique key so that the expression will be unique and thus we can identify which sequential number we have assigned.
The expression: Nz(DMax(“[PONum]”,”tblPO”),0)+1 will check if a PONum already exists. If it doesn’t it returns a 1, if it does it returns the number incremented by 1. If the number exists, but is 0 it will return a 1. In my blog I advise that number should NOT be generated until the user is ready to save the record. And to immediately commit the record after generating the number. Therefore, there should be no issue about giving them a new number if they go back to it.
I am having trouble with this procedure. My situation is almost identical to example #2. I want to populate RecordNumber on my form with a date number like “130001, 130002, etc.” where “13” is the year based on a date automatically generated in the OpenDate field in tblLogRecords. OpenDate is a date/time type field that has a default value of the date the record is created and is not editable. I have added a field called Sequence to tblLogRecords and it is a Number, Long Integer type. I also created a bound control for Sequence on my form. I have a completely separate autonumber field as the PK.
I also use InDesign. An Excel file for numbering is easy to create. Then find DataMerge under Automate to link the data file. When you are ready to export, use the create PDF right on the Datamerge window. You can print as cut / stack on the Fiery (or CREO). REMEMBER - if your customer wants them stapled into books of 6 (for example) each stack has to be divisible by 6 if you are going to staple then cut into individual books.
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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