Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.
You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.
Next we will look at scenario 2. The variation here is that Apex wants to start each year with anew sequence of numbers. Also, they want to include the year when displaying this number. We still use a DMax, but we need to add criteria to determine the year. So Apex needs to have a field in their table that indicates the date. Generally, such inquiries will have a date/time stamp to indicate when received or the user will input the date and time. So we will assume there is a field in record called InquiryDate. We will also add an Integer field named Sequence. On the form we will add a control bound to Sequence, but set its Visible property to No. The line of code will look like this:
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.

* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
I have a large job for a client who uses antique computers. They are so old that he can't run Lightroom. As a workaround, I posted the images I wanted him to look at on SmugMug and we had a disaster. Their sequencing on screen does not match my "as shot" sorting on my Lightroom (4). Is there a way I can print sequential serial numbers/ids on my images before I upload them to SmugMug so we are always talking about the same image?
Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
Hi Maria, there is a way for your endnote numbering to restart at 1 for each chapter when all your chapters are in a single document. You’re right that they revert to Continuous when imported into InDesign, but you can change your Endnote Options to restart the numbering at the beginning of each Story (a story is a set of linked text frames) and then divide your chapters into stories. Here’s what to do:
With this expression we check only for records that are in the same year as the Inquiry date to increment the sequence. Again, the NZ function will automatically restart the sequence with each year. Cleary, though, we cannot generate this number until the InquiryDate has been entered. Is this value is a user entry, then you may want to check that it’s filled in before generating the number. Something like:
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