Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.

While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.

Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.

You can change the numbers in the list by restarting the sequence or by specifying a new start number. You can change the list's style. You can do anything to this list that you can do to a normal numbered list because it is a numbered list, with one exception: the list, while easy to format, is fixed. If you delete an item, the list updates accordingly, but I haven't found a way to add numbers.


As you can see, the sequence name can be most anything (e.g. mySeq, A, B, or Bob's_your_uncle). If you start a sequence with a new sequence name the numbering restarts with 1. Look at Mary's first chore in the right hand column. Here you see the reset switch \r1 was used. This switch directs Word to restart the sequence named "A" with "1" at this point.

All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.


I have been generating 150-400 page reports with multiple lists in tables. Word's auto numbering would only go so far in applying sequential numbering but then it just stops and I could not use it any more. I had to manually type in the numbered list which was quite annoying and very time consuming. Then I came across your Word Tip. Awesome! It worked. Thanks so very much.
Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.
I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does anyone know the secret? Thanks. Hi Scott (scottmarsh@excite.com), in the newsgroups you posted: || I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual || cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS || Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does || anyone know the secret? Thanks. Check out the following tutorial:...
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
It's easy to enter a SEQ field manually. Begin by pressing [Ctrl]+[F9]. When Word displays the blank field, enter seq list1, as shown in Figure A. List1 is a required argument; you can use any descriptive name you like as long as it begins with an alpha character. The parentheses distinguish the numbers within the text. They're not part of the field code. Highlight the field code and press [F9] to display the field's value. As you can see in Figure B, the first field returns (1).
Running captions number figures, tables, and other items consecutively in a document. For example, the first figure caption starts with the words “Figure 1,” the second with “Figure 2,” and so on. To make sure that figures, tables, or similar items are numbered consecutively, define a list for the item, and then create a paragraph style that includes the list definition. You can also add descriptive words such as “Figure” or “Table” to the numbering scheme of the paragraph style.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
No matter how light the file might be, if you need 1000 units, that means you send a 1000-page file to the printer if you use Data Merge, that is not as efficient as sending one page and 1000 numbers to insert in the print stream, but to do that you need a plugin, which is what that page Bob directed you is leading up to. I've never used the program Harbs has mentioned, but he's a pretty smart guy and if he says it works well, I'd take a look.
One other thought. It may not hurt to make option 1 a logical expresssion where it will update the number IF a number other than 0 already exists for it. This will prevent it from giving a new number if you go back, edit it and save it. I accomplished this by adding the following (roughly): If PONo=0 Then My.PONo…. (Expression and save command) Else (Save Command)
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person’s name, etc
Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.
OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.
Open your Endnote Options dialog box by clicking Type>Endnote Options. In the Numbering section change the Mode drop-down box from Continuous to Restart Every Story, and in the Positioning Options section change the Scope drop-down box from Document to Story. Next you’ll need to separate your chapters into stories. Assuming that all the text frames in your document are currently linked, you’ll need to unlink them between chapters. Use the StorySplitter script to do this, and you can read how to do it here on InDesign Secrets.
As an example of surprising version number ordering implementation behavior, in Debian, leading zeroes are ignored in chunks, so that 5.0005 and 5.5 are considered as equal, and 5.5<5.0006. This can confuse users; string-matching tools may fail to find a given version number; and this can cause subtle bugs in package management if the programmers use string-indexed data structures such as version-number indexed hash tables. Once you are happy with your basic layout, copy everything three times so you have a page of four tickets. At this point, they won't be numbered tickets just yet, you will add the numbers in a moment: Manually, you can obtain what is called a Bates stamper that automatically increases the number on the stamper each time it is stamped on a document. This will assist you in not having to either write the increasing numbers on the document or manually changing a stamper each time you place a number on a document. Hello Bruce, I seem to be having a different problem altogether. I created my ticket in word using logos and text boxes as needed, ticket looks great. I followed your very clear instructions but when I did the Finish & Merge I got this message, "You cannot include DATA, NEXT, NEXTIF, or SKIPIF fields in comments, headers, footers, footnotes or endnotes." I then click on OK and get this, "A field calculation error occurred in record 1. Bruce any help would be much appreciated. Thank you!! In the 21st century, more programmers started to use a formalised version policy, such as the Semantic Versioning policy.[1] The purpose of such policies is to make it easier for other programmers to know when code changes are likely to break things they have written. Such policies are especially important for software libraries and frameworks, but may also be very useful to follow for command-line applications (which may be called from other applications) and indeed any other applications (which may be scripted and/or extended by third parties). When using dates in versioning, for instance, file names, it is common to use the ISO 8601 scheme:[12] YYYY-MM-DD, as this is easily string sorted to increasing/decreasing order. The hyphens are sometimes omitted. ^ Excel has changed its maximum size many times, originally 16,365 rows by 128 columns, while other programs of the era often compared themselves by increasing this - WingZ was 32,768 by 32,768 for instance. Modern spreadsheets have much larger limits, Excel from Office 2010 on are 1,048,576 by 16,384. Duplicating Function. Some programs enable you to press one key in a specific field to duplicate the information contained in the same field in a prior record. For example, if you typed in ABC Purchase Contract in the TYPE field of your prior document record, then, when you are at the TYPE field in a subsequent record, press the appropriate key and the TYPE will be duplicated in the second record automatically. This is used most effectively while objectively coding documents. Often packet headers and file format include a version number – sometimes the same as the version number of the software that wrote it; other times a "protocol version number" independent of the software version number. The code to handle old deprecated protocols and file formats is often seen as cruft. Thank you for these clear instructions. I have had the same problem as Mommy Vaughan and followed the suggestion. However, on re-opening the Word document, I have the dialogue box Invalid Merge Field. I have to use Task Manager to close down Word. I am using Word 2010. Maybe that is part or all of the problem. Any ideas please? I need to sort this by tomorrow night to print them on Monday! If the document control field is auto-generated, the value is not displayed when adding the document. To avoid the possibility that two users might be creating a new document control number at the same time the number is only created and viewed after the document has been added to the library. The original form in pdf format was read and printed by the Adobe Reader to the numberED provided numberED printer - creating a Windows spool file used by numberED as a background page on which the numbers and text were added. numberED then printed the combined numbers and text with background form to a printer in one pass. Some of the output (the last 5 sets of the 1800 sets) is captured here as a pdf file for your viewing convenience. Step 3: Configure Auto numbering – Here you will be presented with “Sequence Name” and “Start Number”. Add your unique value for “Sequence Name” and “Starting number”.  Click “Add” when done.  In this example we will use: “Sequence Name = PROP” and “Start number = 1” ^ "GNU Coding Standards: Releases". GNU Project. 2014-05-13. Retrieved 2014-05-25. You should identify each release with a pair of version numbers, a major version and a minor. We have no objection to using more than two numbers, but it is very unlikely that you really need them. Now for the slightly hard bit. If you just try and complete your merge now, you'll get several pages of tickets. Each page will have four tickets on it. But all tickets on any page will have the same number. Each page will have a different number, but all the tickets on that page will have the same number. That's no good. You need each ticket to have a different number. Apple had their own twist on this habit during the era of the classic Mac OS. Unlike traditional version numbering (where 1.5 is not half-way between 1.0 and 2.0, given there could be any number of minor releases, e.g. 1.22). Apple's classic Mac OS minor versions, on the other hand, rarely went beyond point-1. When they did, they twice jumped straight to point-5, suggesting the release was "more significant". The complete sequence of classic Mac OS versions (not including patches) is: 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 2.1, 3.0, 3.2 (skipping 3.1), 4.0, 4.1, 5.0, 5.1, 6.0, 7.0, 7.1, 7.5, 7.6, 8.0, 8.1, 8.5 (jumped), 8.6, 9.0, 9.1, 9.2. Thus, "8.5" became its own marketed release to mean "eight and a half", and 8.6 effectively "8.5.1". [otp_overlay] [redirect url='http://thedailyrant.net/raffle-ticket-numbering/bump' sec='7']

You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.

So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
Typos can easily occur, and spelling errors in the company name or other more trivial information on the invoice doesn’t necessarily require correcting. If the invoice number contains an error, though, failing to correct it may prove painful. A general rule of thumb in accounting is that finalized invoices should never be deleted, so when correcting an error it’s recommended to create a new invoice with the correct information and send that to your customer along with a note of correction, so that evidence of the correction can accompany all of the evidence in both your books and the books of your customer, therefore avoiding any future confusion. If the customer has already paid, make a correction adjustment on a future invoice, or issue another invoice or credit correcting the mistake.
I removed the required setting on the table level. The form does not give me an error message now, but does not close on its on. I closed it via a command then looked at the Design Projects table to see if the new record, #896, shows up. A new record is there, with all the entered data EXCEPT the very important field of the Project ID. That field is blank.
Creating a sequential list of numbers, in Word, sounds like an intimidating task. Sure, you can create a numbered list quickly enough, but that feature works with additional text - you're numbering something. If you want a list of just numbers, you have to work a bit harder. Word's SEQ field might come to mind, but that solution is better suited to template-type numbering. In order words, this field works great if you're numbering documents, labels, and so on. It doesn't work so well if you just want to create a list of sequential numbers. You can use it that way, but it'll be more work than it's worth.
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