You won’t use any of the standard List Number styles for SEQ field numbering. You need to create your own style if you want correct indentation and alignment with the tab position of the first word after the number. In this example, I’ll create a new style called Step Number, but you can call it whatever you want. In this example, I’ve also used the default settings for tab and hanging indent positions — you can change these later if you want.

Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
My issue is trying to create small dot labels or equivalent to make up sequential alpha numeric labels to identify each individual item that I have in my shop, retrospectively. I have possibly 6-8thousand individual items that need coding for stock take purposes yet I can find no outlet that supply such thing. Do you have any suggestions. My line is antiques/collectables, predominantly china with items ranging in size from 2-3cm to 5/600cm. I would be most grateful for any solutions or suggestions. Best regards. Pete.

Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.
Thank you for these instructions!! I’m using them to auto number my son’s baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I’m using Word on a PC. Thanks!!

No matter how light the file might be, if you need 1000 units, that means you send a 1000-page file to the printer if you use Data Merge, that is not as efficient as sending one page and 1000 numbers to insert in the print stream, but to do that you need a plugin, which is what that page Bob directed you is leading up to. I've never used the program Harbs has mentioned, but he's a pretty smart guy and if he says it works well, I'd take a look.


I need a running number from 1001-1200, so after I apply the print merge, it creates 200pgs of the voucher.When I try to save this file, it takes almost half an hour to do so.I think this is due to the heavy file size?In addition, the local print shop knows nothing about print merge and imposition, so I have to prepare the artwork readily in A3 size to print.The imposition creates a 10pgs files.I wanted to save this as PDF to preserve the color, but it turned out to be a nightmare (in daytime) for me that it takes more than2 hours to generate the 10pgs PDF.

In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.


The Nz function will return 0 if there are no records so this expression will return a 1 the first time and then increment the highest number each additional time. The key is where to put this line of code. As I said it needs to be generated immediately prior to saving the record so that another user does not get the same number. So generally I would put this behind a Save button or a button to specifically generate the number. I would then add a second line to commit the records. Either:
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
So, if you wanted to use this idea in a form or datasheet, let me stop and first remind you – if this is going to be non-updatable, you can just embed a report as a subreport within a form and thus use Running Sum. But let’s discuss the case where you need to be able to edit data in the forms, even with sequential numbering generated for the data you are viewing. This means we need to be able to tie a sequential number to a specific row.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
Running captions number figures, tables, and other items consecutively in a document. For example, the first figure caption starts with the words “Figure 1,” the second with “Figure 2,” and so on. To make sure that figures, tables, or similar items are numbered consecutively, define a list for the item, and then create a paragraph style that includes the list definition. You can also add descriptive words such as “Figure” or “Table” to the numbering scheme of the paragraph style.
And of course, it’s not only when you add or delete counters that the numbering auto-updates, but also when you copy or move the text, as when you’re rearranging your listed points. This InDesign inline counter now works exactly like the counters in my old, beloved XyWrite word processors — except I cannot have several counters with separate numbering in the same text story. In XyWrite I could have nine, using only the codes c1, c2,…c9. But for 95% of one’s counter needs, one counter per story is quite ample — as compared to none.
Hi, this is a great write up. I am very new to InDesign and i print onto a range of products and my first order with sequential numbering came up (serial numbers), I have the template made in illustrator and i also have the numbers added (00001 on all of the art work). A friend told me InDesign has a function for automatically incrasing the numbers by 1 for each art work. I have 105 pieces per template, is there a way to import the design and then sort the number (already text edible) and then save as a pdf then send to print?

And of course, it’s not only when you add or delete counters that the numbering auto-updates, but also when you copy or move the text, as when you’re rearranging your listed points. This InDesign inline counter now works exactly like the counters in my old, beloved XyWrite word processors — except I cannot have several counters with separate numbering in the same text story. In XyWrite I could have nine, using only the codes c1, c2,…c9. But for 95% of one’s counter needs, one counter per story is quite ample — as compared to none.

you'd need to use a before save macro. Something like the macro at the end - but it would run on every save, which may not be what you want. I use a macro that gets the invoice # and saves (it does several things). I added a button to the ribbon that calls a macro that runs several macros: Sub FinalizeInvoice() CreateInvoiceNumber CopyToExcel FinalCleanup ' this does the save End Sub This is an automated macro - but it will run every time the file is saved. Private WithEvents App As Word.Application Private Sub Document_Open() Set App = Word.Application… Read more »
Hi Tara, Thanks for sharing your observations! I agree that breaking your chapters into separate text frames is not the ideal way to go, but is only useful if you must have live endnotes at the end of each chapter rather than at the back of the book. One alternative in this scenario is to create a separate InDesign document for each chapter, then use the Book feature to tie them all together. Whether your chapters are in separate text frames or in separate documents, you’ll still need to be very vigilant with any changes to the flow of text to make sure the pagination is okay.
A quick search at the top using the term “document numbering” shows 46 different threads, with very good advice, for the most part.  I would first recommend you perform the same search and see what advice may be gleaned from those far older and wiser than myself.  In order to directly answer your question, I would refer you to the following discussion thread.  Many talk about the physical numbering system to use, which is important, and many discuss the frustration that a new person to the position feels when they inherit a mess from someone else and wish to clean it up. 
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
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