The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
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Version numbers are used in practical terms by the consumer, or client, to identify or compare their copy of the software product against another copy, such as the newest version released by the developer. For the programmer or company, versioning is often used on a revision-by-revision basis, where individual parts of the software are compared and contrasted with newer or older revisions of those same parts, often in a collaborative version control system.
2. In Word 2007 & later, if you put the macro into your 'Capital_Unit_Certificate' document, you'll need to save the document in the docm format and you'll need to enable macros whenever you open the document if you want to print the certificate. Alternatively, if you add the macro to Word's 'Normal' template, the macro will always be available (to you only) an you can keep the document in it's docx format - plus you won't get macro warnings every time you open it. sequentially numbering in word
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