There are also other problems – for one thing, it’s not a very generic solution. You must customize several parts to work for different queries. If the set of tables used in the outermost FROM clause are different, to be the innermost FROM clause, you have to adjust the WHERE clause to reference the correct primary key (or some combination thereof). Then you have to also keep the ORDER BY in sync. That’s a lot of tweaks if you want to use it for different queries. That is why this is the last method listed here but it is one possible solution.
There are also other problems – for one thing, it’s not a very generic solution. You must customize several parts to work for different queries. If the set of tables used in the outermost FROM clause are different, to be the innermost FROM clause, you have to adjust the WHERE clause to reference the correct primary key (or some combination thereof). Then you have to also keep the ORDER BY in sync. That’s a lot of tweaks if you want to use it for different queries. That is why this is the last method listed here but it is one possible solution.

Hi. Do you know if there is a way for these endnotes to restart at 1 with each new chapter in a single document? I usually work on 400+ page books with hundreds of end notes. The house style is for them to restart at 1 with each chapter. I am able to set this up in Word before importing to ID but they revert to continous in layout. I don’t want to have to set up multiple ID files.

i have used batch process to make a whole bunch of photos one size.  I need to create a single 'photo wall' jpg out of them in which they're all tiled, the long way of doing this is to obv open them all and copy, paste into the psd, then flatten, but thats really, really time consuming.  If photoshop had any type of auto import & tile feature?  I may have to do this a 2nd time with 1000's of images.
The last option that we’ll present for assigning invoice numbers is according to project number. This is most useful for companies that take on projects where that number is the most important reference for the work. These invoice numbers will include the project number, customer number, and sequence number, with the sequence number at the end. An invoice numbering system organized by project could either begin with the customer number:
Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.

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A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.
Can anyone tell me what the maximum no. of worksheets is in Excel? Ton From Help...Limited by available memory (default is 3) -- HTH Nick Hodge Microsoft MVP - Excel Southampton, England nick_hodgeTAKETHISOUT@zen.co.uk.ANDTHIS "Ton" wrote in message news:EB5EE739-9250-4D83-AA7C-EE82C02C0AA3@microsoft.com... > Can anyone tell me what the maximum no. of worksheets is in Excel? The maximum number only depends on the amount of memory available. -- Best Regards Leo Heuser Followup to newsgroup only please. "Ton"
There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.
To design a certificate from scratch, you can either start with a completely blank publication or adapt an existing publication. Small-sized publication types, such as business cards, postcards, and labels can be adapted to serve as coupons. Flyers or brochures can be adapted for use as gift certificates. For more information, see Create a publication in Publisher.
The system that you choose for numbering your invoices should correspond to your most prominent needs to make it as easy as possible for invoices to be located for referencing, and the sequence number must always be last to help you keep track and avoid duplication. Lots of accounting software provides an invoice number generator to help with this task.
To make the endnote numbering sequential page by page, here’s what to do: Find the first page that has a break-out box with an endnote. On that page only, cut-and-paste each text frame into a new or different document. Then cut-and-paste each text frame back onto the page in the order they will be read. That will get the endnote numbers in the right order. Do this for every page that has a break-out box, but leave all the other pages as they are. That’s the workaround!
InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.
So, if you wanted to use this idea in a form or datasheet, let me stop and first remind you – if this is going to be non-updatable, you can just embed a report as a subreport within a form and thus use Running Sum. But let’s discuss the case where you need to be able to edit data in the forms, even with sequential numbering generated for the data you are viewing. This means we need to be able to tie a sequential number to a specific row.
John, Sorry for the delay, but I was away last week with limited Internet access. I assumed if you had a Save button, you would know how to put code behind it. To see the code behind a button, Select the button in Form Design Mode and open the Properties Dialog (Right click and select properties), on the Events tab there should be something in the On Click event of the button. If you click the Ellipses […] next to the event, it will open Code Builder where you can enter the code.
I haven’t tried this… But according to the Microsoft instructions about field switches (http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/insert-and-format-field-codes-HA010338798.aspx), you can add text to a field code. The text must be in single quote marks, and displays as a constant for the field. The examples on that web page show the text at the end of the field, but you could try it earlier in the field by testing putting ‘120/’ in front of where the SEQ number will go.
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Another issue with the part-numbering format is part number designation. Some systems associate a part number with a particular part type. For example, 10xxx indicates a procedure, 20xxx indicates a drawing, PLxxx indicates a policy-level document, and so on. An alternative approach to part numbering is a “no designation” system, where parts are given sequential unique numbers within a specified format, regardless of their type, material, application or other attributes. After all, isn’t the part title the best designator?
OK, First, you need to reread the blog. You should NOT be storing the Transaction_ID. It is a calculated value. Second, your naming is what confused me. Your Passenger table should have an autonumber PassengerID. That PassengerID should be the Foreign Key in your Reservations table. Your servation table should also have an autonumber for ReservationID. I really don’t see why you need sequential numbering in the passenger table. I can understand it in the Reservations table, but not in the passenger table. Also, I don’t see any reason for a transaction date in the passenger table. I can understand a CreateDate for when the passenger signed up.

Bullets and Numbering options in InDesign aren’t just for boring lists. You can auto-number items like captions, even incorporating prefixes like figure labels. Depending on how your document is set up, there are two ways to achieve this. Both involve setting up a paragraph style that incorporates numbering from the Bullets and Numbering feature. Generally I create a temporary text frame—often on my pasteboard—and set some items to create my style, pasting the text into my actual caption frames after the fact.


A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.
This requires no pre-knowledge of a primary key and only assumes that when you load the form initially, it is already sorted. Any records newly inserted will get the next bigger number. However, if you requery and it causes the newly inserted rows to be re-sorted, they will be now given a new number that relates to their actual position within the set, which can be either good or bad, depending on your specific requirements.
To recap, you use a DMax function to return the highest number in the Sequence and increment it by 1. You assign the incremented number to a control on your form and then immediately save the record. If your identifier includes additional information from the record, you use an expression that concatenates that information with the sequence number to display the full identifier.
Version control is one of the most critical elements of a document management system because it ensure users always have access to the most current version of a company document. This feature alone can cost justify the implementation of a document management system as it eliminates duplication of work and allows users to share the most current information on matters such as company policies or contracts.
Note  If TAB and SHIFT+TAB do not work for changing the indents for outline numbering, you probably have the option Tabs and Backspace set left Indent turned off. To change this setting, from the Tools menu, choose Options. Select the Edit tab and check the option Tabs and backspace set left indent. As an alternative to turning this option on, you can instead use ALT+SHIFT+LEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW to increase or decrease outline numbering.
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)
So, if you wanted to use this idea in a form or datasheet, let me stop and first remind you – if this is going to be non-updatable, you can just embed a report as a subreport within a form and thus use Running Sum. But let’s discuss the case where you need to be able to edit data in the forms, even with sequential numbering generated for the data you are viewing. This means we need to be able to tie a sequential number to a specific row.

Hello! I already have automatic numbering set up (to change paragraph numbers automatically when paragraphs are moved within a document) but I would also like to have automatic lettering within the same document that is independent from the numbering. Example, paragraph 1 references Exhibit A, paragraph 2 references Exhibit B, so on and so forth. Currently using the above referenced method, the auto numbering lettering then follows as if the letters are a representation of the corresponding number (if that makes sense), ex: 1 B 3 C 5 D. How do I have the number sequencing independent from the letter sequence? Thank you in advance!
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