The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.
I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does anyone know the secret? Thanks. Hi Scott (scottmarsh@excite.com), in the newsgroups you posted: || I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual || cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS || Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does || anyone know the secret? Thanks. Check out the following tutorial:...
Typos can easily occur, and spelling errors in the company name or other more trivial information on the invoice doesn’t necessarily require correcting. If the invoice number contains an error, though, failing to correct it may prove painful. A general rule of thumb in accounting is that finalized invoices should never be deleted, so when correcting an error it’s recommended to create a new invoice with the correct information and send that to your customer along with a note of correction, so that evidence of the correction can accompany all of the evidence in both your books and the books of your customer, therefore avoiding any future confusion. If the customer has already paid, make a correction adjustment on a future invoice, or issue another invoice or credit correcting the mistake.

In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.

You may be familiar to view multiple webpages in Firefox/Chrome/IE, and switch between them by clicking corresponding tabs easily. Here, Office Tab supports similar processing, which allow you to browse multiple Excel workbooks or Word documents in one Excel window or Word window, and easily switch between them by clicking their tabs. Click for free trial of Office Tab!
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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