2. Yes, The code should be entered using CodeBuilder. Where you enter it depends on how and when you want to trigger the generation of the next number. If you want to use a button, that works. And no, you don’t use 000 in the NZ() function. If you want to DISPLAY at least 3 digits with leading zeros, then you do that in the Format function. Note, though, you will need to change that when you hit 1000 POs.
There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.

When generating invoice numbers based on the customer number, you can choose whether or not to include any date information. Either way, the number will begin with the customer number and then be followed by the date (if desired) and the sequence number. No matter how you decide to structure your invoice number, the sequence number always needs to come at the end. This makes it easiest to find and to differentiate from the others in its sequence.

If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.
I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.
Version control is one of the most critical elements of a document management system because it ensure users always have access to the most current version of a company document. This feature alone can cost justify the implementation of a document management system as it eliminates duplication of work and allows users to share the most current information on matters such as company policies or contracts.
My intention is to use these features to take photos of monuments and have the people who are moving about removed from the final image (I guess it's the auto-align that would do this.) I tried a test and took a number of photos at home but I kept moving one object around (a pen.) The pen appears in all the images but in a different location so it always appears in the final image. When I tried auto-align with a stack that included one image without the pen, the pen was removed from the final image. Given the first scenario (i.e. the object is in all the images but in a different location) is there any way of automatically removing it using auto-align or would this have to be a manual process? In the real world, it would be possible to take a photo of a monument with people in different locations but it would be much harder (or take a long time) to take one where at least one person was not in all the photos (there's always someone loitering.)

Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.
I normally use "Data Merge" in InDesign and use Excel (or something like it) to generate the list of numbers for me. You would copy the numbers into a text file so that InDesign can read them as the merge data source. Note that you would have one ticket on the page and then let InDesign set the other tickets on the page (you can tell the Data Merge control panel about spacing).
Ok, generating a random 3 digit number is a whole different thing, so I’m not going to go into that. If you want your numbers to start at 100 (to insure three digits) then change the 0 to 99. The Nz function will return the value listed if the field is Null. So the first time you execute that code, the DMax should return a Null since no numbers have been generated for the PONum field. The Nz will then substitute 99 and then increment that by 1. You can accomplish something similar by just entering 100 as the PONum for one record. .
Important: A new label is saved ONLY on the computer where it was created (in Word's local Normal template). It cannot be exchanged with the document. This means that everyone who wants to use the label needs to re-create it on their local computer. Therefore the decision to use customised labels should be taken on the workgroup level and well communicated to everyone involved.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.
Typos can easily occur, and spelling errors in the company name or other more trivial information on the invoice doesn’t necessarily require correcting. If the invoice number contains an error, though, failing to correct it may prove painful. A general rule of thumb in accounting is that finalized invoices should never be deleted, so when correcting an error it’s recommended to create a new invoice with the correct information and send that to your customer along with a note of correction, so that evidence of the correction can accompany all of the evidence in both your books and the books of your customer, therefore avoiding any future confusion. If the customer has already paid, make a correction adjustment on a future invoice, or issue another invoice or credit correcting the mistake.
The expression: Nz(DMax(“[PONum]”,”tblPO”),0)+1 will check if a PONum already exists. If it doesn’t it returns a 1, if it does it returns the number incremented by 1. If the number exists, but is 0 it will return a 1. In my blog I advise that number should NOT be generated until the user is ready to save the record. And to immediately commit the record after generating the number. Therefore, there should be no issue about giving them a new number if they go back to it.
Yes, I have used this system in a multi-user setting. As noted, the key is to commit the record immediately after generating the sequence. However, if the application is one where there is very heavy transaction processing. In other words dozens of users creating records simultaneously, you might want to guard further against duplication. At the speeds computers process, it is not impossible that multiple users will grab the max value before it can be incremented and saved.
Thank you for these instructions!! I’m using them to auto number my son’s baseball team raffle tickets which we hand numbered last year (UGH!). I followed the instructions exactly but for some reason the numbering is starting at 2 every time. I did deselect the checkbox about the column headers which seems the obvious culprit. Any ideas? I’m using Word on a PC. Thanks!!
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
If you are still reading this then perhaps you are looking for a simple and reliable way to number a couple of lists in a Word document. If you read John's article then you have already been informed that field numbering is simple and robust. If you are like 9 out of 10 Word users in my office then anything more than 1. space space Blah, blah "enter" 2. space space Blah, blah ... defies simple! If that applies to you, then the "SeqField Numbering" Add-In presented later in this page is for you.

i have gone through the intersting discussions on this site. I am having a problem with foot notes in Adobe in design cs 4. when i pasted a fresh set of pages in a doc in- in design, the fn numbering starts from 1 all over again in the fresh set of pages. i am not able to insert foot notes manually, as it does not creat the space below the text. I am stuck for help


I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the number of copies each time I print? Hi you could record a macro while doing this manually and assign a shortcut or button to this recorded macro -- Regards Frank Kabel Frankfurt, Germany Hebert45 wrote: > I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. > Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the > number of copies each time I print? ...
Regarding exporting to EPUB, I have very limited experience in that department! I understood that InDesign compiles the EPUB using text and image frames in the order they appear in the document? So that chapter 2 would naturally follow chapter 1, and so on? If each chapter is in a separate document and all chapters are linked together using the Book feature, I think you can export to EPUB in a similar way that you can export to PDF?

Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers


There also seems to be a discrepancy how Orientation is described under Metadata for those images which DO auto rotate : sometimes it is -90 (which is how I hold the camera for verticals and which displays on most verticals) and sometimes it is "normal" even when it has auto rotated the image.   I do not understand this difference."Normal" is also used to describe the orientation of those images which DO NOT auto rotate for viewing.
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Perhaps your explanation already addresses this, but I can’t see it. Is there any way this script can be used for printing multiple-up in numeric sequence? For example, if I’m running 1000 postcards 4-up (on 250 sheets). I need the 4 cards on page 1 to be numbered 1, 251, 501, 751; then the 4 cards on page 2 numbered 2, 252, 502, 752; etc., so that when the sheets come out of the printer and are cut into 4, I have a stack of 1-250, a stack of 251-500, a stack of 501-750 and a stack of 751-1000.
Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.

The system that you choose for numbering your invoices should correspond to your most prominent needs to make it as easy as possible for invoices to be located for referencing, and the sequence number must always be last to help you keep track and avoid duplication. Lots of accounting software provides an invoice number generator to help with this task.
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