Rhonda, Thank you for your amazingly quick and thorough reply! You are correct, Word does the Table and Figure numbering splendidly. I was trying to reference those numbers in the text, which I see is a function done quite well in Word using Cross Reference: ‘In Word 2007 and 2010: Display the References tab. In the Captions group, click on the Cross-reference button.’ Thanks again, Joshua.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
That’s it! From now on, all you have to do to add SEQ field numbering is either type in your AutoCorrect text (1] and n]) or select the options from your Quick Parts list. If you find your numbering gets out of whack (remember, the numbers don’t update when you insert a new number between two existing numbers, or delete a number), select the sequence and press F9 (Hint: To update all fields for the entire document, press Ctrl+A then F9).
I have done this twice now, getting flustered. The ticket part the person keeps has the correct sequential number on it, but the side that we keep has the same number on it for the whole page. What part am I missing, at first I did not uncheck the box, but this time I did but have the same number on the stub side that we keep with the person’s name, etc
Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
As you can see, an idea of sequential numbering can be solved many different ways using different domains. This is typical in this field of work and precisely why it pays to not just consider how you can do it in one domain but also whether the domain is the right domain. We saw how we can easily leverage built-in features such as Transact-SQL’s ROW_NUMBER() or Access report’s Running Sum property. We also not only saw how we can craft our custom solutions in either VBA or SQL but we also see how we can use both together to create a solution that is better.
This one is EASY. In InDesign, with a one-sided NCR form, cut the all elements from the first page. Go to your Master page and place. Where you are going to number the forms, draw a text box and insert a page number marker there. Format it to your liking, then insert as many pages as SETS are going to be made. When you go to print, enter 2 or 3 in the copies box, depending if it's 2-part or 3-part and under the properties button, select GROUPED or UNCOLLATED, turn off OFFSET. Violá!

For whatever reason, AllExperts did not let me post a direct reply to your response re: “Ok, what is the ControlSource of the Fixture Number control? It should be: =cboZone & “-” & Format(Me.FNumber,”000″)” and adding “Me.Refresh” to my code (within the last 10 minutes). It just had the “rate this reply”. I added the Me.Refresh and corrected my location of the =cboZone code and it works correctly now.
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
I'm using Column A of a spreadsheet to number some items in Column B. I've been using Excel's automatic series-filling function, where you drag down from the lower right corner of a cell. However, since some of the rows in Column B are empty, and I don't want them numbered, I have to stop numbering and manually "jump" over the blanks in Column A. Is there a way to automatically number down in Column A, while skipping over the blanks and continuing where I left off? I.e. 1 2 3 4 5 ? Thanks much. Try this in A1: =IF(B1<>"",COUNTA($B$1:B1),"...

InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.

Using a template to write invoices saves you a fair bit of time. While you still have to enter all of the payment information for each order on your own, sample invoices provide a ready-made design that you just have to fill in using the relevant company and customer data. But how does the perfect invoice template really look? And what should an invoice template consist of?

Here is my problem. i have a series of 3 digit numbers that need to be cinverted to a series of 4 digit numbers using this following 722 needs to read as 5622 and in the next collum SV-7822 in the collum's to the right. what type of formula is this and how can i do it? The above is an example, i have a whole range of 3 digit numbers that need the exact. rules applied to all numbers. which is why i need a formula to do it. Help someone please!!!! I'm not completely clear on what your looking for but if 722 was in A1 in B1: = A1 + 4900 in B2: = ="SV-" & A1 + 7100...
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
It will ask for the number of copies that you want to make and sequentially number each copy.The first time this macro runs, the first copy will be numbered 1 and when it finishes running, it will store in aSettings.Txt file the number that is one more that the number on the last copy.The next time the macro is run, it will start numbering the copies from that number. If when you first start, you want the numbers to start at some number other than 1, run the macro, entering 1 as the number of copies and then open Settings.Txt file and replace the number in the file with the number that you want as the first in the series.At any time thereafter, if you want the series to start at a particular number, you can open that file and replace the number in it with the number that you want to be the first in the series.
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