John, Sorry for the delay, but I was away last week with limited Internet access. I assumed if you had a Save button, you would know how to put code behind it. To see the code behind a button, Select the button in Form Design Mode and open the Properties Dialog (Right click and select properties), on the Events tab there should be something in the On Click event of the button. If you click the Ellipses […] next to the event, it will open Code Builder where you can enter the code.


* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?


The auto-indenting feature of bullets and lists has always frustrated me. EVERY time you apply a numbered or bulleted list, you've got to set the indents. I want my lists to be indented at the very left of the page, flush with the rest of the paragraphs. But no, Microsoft insists that you want them indented by 0.63cm and hanging at 1.27cm (WHY 0.63? Why not 0.7? Or 1.0cm? But that's a question for a different session.) (I know, it's because MS is American and still uses inches etc...)


Another fan of Fusion Pro Desktop here. This is exactly what you need. We have sold both PrintShop Mail and Fusion Pro Desktop for this very application (numbering) and other VDP applications. Fusion Pro Desktop easily beats PrintShop Mail from both a price and performance viewpoint. You could also try Printer's Bench http://www.elkriversystems.com/ProductsList.aspx for a good entry level package
So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!

Hi, is there any limit on the number of E-Mails ? I created an archive of 270000 E-Mails (IMAP) and it caused trouble. Can I have that amount in a local folder ? Are there any recommended number ? It locked that 50000 starts being a problem on IMAP already. How else would you handle an archive that you need frequently ? Thanks for your help Stephan If it were me... exporting them(selectively) to user created properly named Windows Explorer blank folders on the hard drive and backing up to a different drive(internal/external/cd/dvd) outside of Windows Live Mail woul...
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Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.


Ok I guess it is better for me to explain what I am doing. I am in the process of creating an Access Database that an individual has been using an Excel spreadsheet forever and a day. Well the individual has on occasion doubled up numbers, forgot numbers, etc. So on what I have learned from different Access courses and Google searches I am trying to apply my knowledge.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.
The first number in this identifier is the date, followed by the customer number, and the unique sequence number. The last number is important if you have multiple invoices for the same customer on the same date – in that case, the next invoice would be numbered 05232017-4602-01. The date format can be selected from a variety of options as well. The example above uses the DDMMYYYY format, but alternate options include MMDDYYYY, DDMMYY, YYYYDDMM, or YYDDMM, among others.
I know that I can select all of the clips and then move the play head to approx 1/10 of a second and split the clips. This works except I have to go through and manually delete the bits I don't want which is tedious enough for a video with 82 images but I am planning on longer projects, doing it manually would be a nightmare. Also I could probably re-order the images manually but I am sure that there must be an easier.

When typesetting a book, it’s often necessary to insert a forced line break in a chapter title. Let’s say your chapter title runs to two lines, and it isn’t breaking in a great place. What do you do to fix it? You add a forced line break (soft return). But later, when you automatically generate your TOC, the TOC will have forced line breaks where they aren’t needed. In the past, those forced line breaks had to be removed manually every time the TOC was generated.
If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
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