Great article. I’m working on a book project with both footnotes and endnotes. Long story, but I had to insert the endnotes manually into each Indesign chapter/file, so they weren’t imported using your method. Nevertheless, InDesign created the nifty text file for my references at the end of each chapter. I found though, when I cut and pasted each text to a single Appendix page in a separate document in the book, the reference numbers disappear from the originating chapter. Can you clarify what I’m doing wrong?
I have a large job for a client who uses antique computers. They are so old that he can't run Lightroom. As a workaround, I posted the images I wanted him to look at on SmugMug and we had a disaster. Their sequencing on screen does not match my "as shot" sorting on my Lightroom (4). Is there a way I can print sequential serial numbers/ids on my images before I upload them to SmugMug so we are always talking about the same image?
I'm really hoping someone might have an answer for me on this one. For the past few months, Photoshop has been auto-adjusting my images. The colors/skin tones look absolutely awful. I have had to adjust every picture to get a non-alien look to them, but they still never look as good as what was in the camera. Has anyone experienced this? If so, were you able to find a fix? I'm a PC user - don't know if that helps. Here are a couple of examples:
The problem with breaking up chapters into separate stories is, then, when I go to export the book to ePUB, the entire book is no longer in one, continuous stream, so it will not export properly. Also, if there are any edits down the road, and there is text reflow, having chapters in separate stories opens up a HUGE can of worms for pagination! Any ideas?
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.

Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.

I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.


If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
The Artifact ID should NOT be your PK. There is no reason for it to be and to try and use it as such will be a headache. A primary key is simply a unique identifier for a record. Many purists will tell you that users should never see the PK and in your case, I would recommend that. Use an Autonumber as you PK and you can use that as your corresponding Foreign Key in related records. To prevent duplication you can make the combination of Collection Point ID and Artifact ID a unique, multi-field index. Then display the combination as I indicated where you need to show the user a record ID. This is all explained int he blog.
If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
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