Yes, I’m a little confused by your brief too. The script that I describe here will create an array of numbers using any step value that it offers, including by 1 number each time. Whether you put the resulting list directly into InDesign as text, or indirectly using the Data Merge feature is up to you. Perhaps learn more about the Data Merge feature of InDesign itself – David Blatner has a great series on Lynda.com that will explain Data Merge much more than I can on this thread.
Regarding exporting to EPUB, I have very limited experience in that department! I understood that InDesign compiles the EPUB using text and image frames in the order they appear in the document? So that chapter 2 would naturally follow chapter 1, and so on? If each chapter is in a separate document and all chapters are linked together using the Book feature, I think you can export to EPUB in a similar way that you can export to PDF?
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.
Before you complete the merge, preview the merge results to make sure that the tracking numbers will display as you want them to in your publications. You can preview the merge in two ways: While you are refining the layout to review the layout of the individual coupon or gift certificate, or when you are getting ready to print, to preview the arrangement of coupons or gift certificates on the printed sheet.
Hi Tara, Thanks for sharing your observations! I agree that breaking your chapters into separate text frames is not the ideal way to go, but is only useful if you must have live endnotes at the end of each chapter rather than at the back of the book. One alternative in this scenario is to create a separate InDesign document for each chapter, then use the Book feature to tie them all together. Whether your chapters are in separate text frames or in separate documents, you’ll still need to be very vigilant with any changes to the flow of text to make sure the pagination is okay.

You will occasionally want to place an unnumbered paragraph in the middle of a sequence, but the moment you hit Enter, another paragraph number pops up. To fix this, toggle paragraph numbering off by pressing the paragraph numbering button you used for the previous paragraph. (If you use the button’s drop-down, choose None as the numbering scheme.) Unfortunately, the paragraph settings won’t revert to Normal here; it’ll usually have the paragraph indented 0.25. Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Q to strip paragraph settings out, then revise the formatting as you wish.
An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.

There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:

Rhonda, Thank you for your amazingly quick and thorough reply! You are correct, Word does the Table and Figure numbering splendidly. I was trying to reference those numbers in the text, which I see is a function done quite well in Word using Cross Reference: ‘In Word 2007 and 2010: Display the References tab. In the Captions group, click on the Cross-reference button.’ Thanks again, Joshua.

Open your Endnote Options dialog box by clicking Type>Endnote Options. In the Numbering section change the Mode drop-down box from Continuous to Restart Every Story, and in the Positioning Options section change the Scope drop-down box from Document to Story. Next you’ll need to separate your chapters into stories. Assuming that all the text frames in your document are currently linked, you’ll need to unlink them between chapters. Use the StorySplitter script to do this, and you can read how to do it here on InDesign Secrets.
I removed the required setting on the table level. The form does not give me an error message now, but does not close on its on. I closed it via a command then looked at the Design Projects table to see if the new record, #896, shows up. A new record is there, with all the entered data EXCEPT the very important field of the Project ID. That field is blank.
Gift certificates and promotional coupons can play an important role in your marketing strategy by drawing new and repeat customers to your business. However, how can you tell if they are really working to help you develop your business? To make the most of your time and your marketing budget, you need to track the success of your marketing efforts so that you can determine what marketing tactics are effective for which customers.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
To enter specific sequential number codes, such as purchase order numbers, you can use the ROW function together with the TEXT function. For example, to start a numbered list by using 000-001, you enter the formula =TEXT(ROW(A1),"000-000") in the first cell of the range that you want to number, and then drag the fill handle to the end of the range.

I removed the required setting on the table level. The form does not give me an error message now, but does not close on its on. I closed it via a command then looked at the Design Projects table to see if the new record, #896, shows up. A new record is there, with all the entered data EXCEPT the very important field of the Project ID. That field is blank.

There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.


    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
John, Sorry for the delay, but I was away last week with limited Internet access. I assumed if you had a Save button, you would know how to put code behind it. To see the code behind a button, Select the button in Form Design Mode and open the Properties Dialog (Right click and select properties), on the Events tab there should be something in the On Click event of the button. If you click the Ellipses […] next to the event, it will open Code Builder where you can enter the code.

As you can see, an idea of sequential numbering can be solved many different ways using different domains. This is typical in this field of work and precisely why it pays to not just consider how you can do it in one domain but also whether the domain is the right domain. We saw how we can easily leverage built-in features such as Transact-SQL’s ROW_NUMBER() or Access report’s Running Sum property. We also not only saw how we can craft our custom solutions in either VBA or SQL but we also see how we can use both together to create a solution that is better.


All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.
This requires no pre-knowledge of a primary key and only assumes that when you load the form initially, it is already sorted. Any records newly inserted will get the next bigger number. However, if you requery and it causes the newly inserted rows to be re-sorted, they will be now given a new number that relates to their actual position within the set, which can be either good or bad, depending on your specific requirements.
I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does anyone know the secret? Thanks. Hi Scott (scottmarsh@excite.com), in the newsgroups you posted: || I am trying to automatically print sequential numbers on individual || cards on 8.5" x 11" business card stock (to create tickets) using MS || Publisher and cannot figure out how to get it to do this. Does || anyone know the secret? Thanks. Check out the following tutorial:...
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
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