Great article. I’m working on a book project with both footnotes and endnotes. Long story, but I had to insert the endnotes manually into each Indesign chapter/file, so they weren’t imported using your method. Nevertheless, InDesign created the nifty text file for my references at the end of each chapter. I found though, when I cut and pasted each text to a single Appendix page in a separate document in the book, the reference numbers disappear from the originating chapter. Can you clarify what I’m doing wrong?

One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.


WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.

We use the auto page numbering trick here, the trick is to do it as spreads. You just make your pages the same size as the ticket with crops and bleeds. Then set up the shell on the master page and place your auto page number where you want your numbers. Each pages is the next number. You can also have two sets of numbers for perforated ticket. You then can use the page start options to add to the numbers and keep the same number of total numbers. For example you would do a new page start after number 99. 0001 to 0099 so it doesn't add two "0's" to the front of 100 and you get 00100 when you want 0100. Works great for small quantities, we have done up to 1000+ tickets and once you do it once or twice it is a snap to set up. To avoid having to do 1000 pages just send the tickets in groups. Usually between 25 to 100 at a time works good depending on artwork file size. Just save each time before sending to printer and name the file with what the tickets are. Like "MyTickets-0001-0100.Indd". Makes it easier to go back if you have a problem. You can even do two rolls of tickets if your using 12 x 18 sheets by flipping the sheet and doing one row along the top and one along the bottom on reverse side. That is if your ticket is single Sided. Two sided tickets are a bit trickier. :-)
Hi Nick, unfortunately InDesign CC2018 doesn’t support live endnotes when using the Book feature. So if your chapters are in separate documents and you’re trying to add the endnotes to your back matter (in another separate document), live endnotes won’t work. I think that’s why your reference numbers are disappearing. The live endnote feature doesn’t work across documents, only within one document, so you’ll need to place the endnotes at the end of each document to keep them live.
IF a document is part of a book and the previous document ended on a right-hand page, AND if your book options are set to allow documents to start on left or right pages, AND if you choose “Automatic Page Numbering,” THEN the document will be allowed to automatically start on the left page. This is great if you need to break a document up in a spot where it’s not necessary for the next document to start on the right.
Ok, generating a random 3 digit number is a whole different thing, so I’m not going to go into that. If you want your numbers to start at 100 (to insure three digits) then change the 0 to 99. The Nz function will return the value listed if the field is Null. So the first time you execute that code, the DMax should return a Null since no numbers have been generated for the PONum field. The Nz will then substitute 99 and then increment that by 1. You can accomplish something similar by just entering 100 as the PONum for one record. .
In this scenario we are assuming that there will be no more than 999 documents attached to a case. In Scenario 2 we assumed no more than 9999 inquires during a year. So you need to adjust the number of zeros when formatting Sequence for the anticipated number of records. Of course this can always be changed later. You also don’t need to format the sequence with leading zeros as the Format function does. As shown the expression returns something like: DCASD/CI123-025 for the 25th document in case CI123 for client DCASD. Without leading zeros it would be: DCASD/CI123-25. The advantage to the latter is that you don’t have to anticipate the number of records you might have in the sequence, but I’ve found many users prefer a more uniform number with the leading zeros.
The problem with breaking up chapters into separate stories is, then, when I go to export the book to ePUB, the entire book is no longer in one, continuous stream, so it will not export properly. Also, if there are any edits down the road, and there is text reflow, having chapters in separate stories opens up a HUGE can of worms for pagination! Any ideas?

So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.
This difference is not simply a case of syntax. In order to provide a large workspace, conventional spreadsheets extend a table in X and Y to form a very large grid – ideally infinite, but normally limited to some smaller dimension.[N 2] Some of these cells, selected by the user, hold data. Data is manipulated using formulas, which are placed in other cells in the same sheet and output their results back into the formula cell’s display. The rest of the sheet is “sparse”, currently unused.[5] Sheets often grow very complex with input data, intermediate values from formulas and output areas, separated by blank areas. In order to manage this complexity, Excel allows one to hide data that is not of interest,[6] often intermediate values. Quattro Pro commonly introduced the idea of multiple sheets in a single book, allowing further subdivision of the data.

An easier way is to setup the table in Excel and use the Excel features to create sequential numbering. The cells making up the whole table can then be selected and copied into a Word document using CTRL/C and CTRL/V which will create a table in Word. Column widths and borders can be set up in Excel and cells can be filled in before copying to the Word document.


Endnote numbering is sequential through the entirety of the linked text frames, treating them as one frame. When you add a new text frame that isn’t linked containing an endnote (such as a break-out or call-out box), InDesign will use an endnote number following the last number in the linked text frames. So if the endnotes in your linked text frames are numbered 1 to 50 and you add a break-out box on page 6, any endnotes in the break-out box will begin with number 51 (and appear totally out of sequence!).
Version numbers are used in practical terms by the consumer, or client, to identify or compare their copy of the software product against another copy, such as the newest version released by the developer. For the programmer or company, versioning is often used on a revision-by-revision basis, where individual parts of the software are compared and contrasted with newer or older revisions of those same parts, often in a collaborative version control system.
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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