Because invoices are not actually required under U.S. law, the creation of an invoice is only done at the discretion of the business. If you are dealing only with domestic clients and have an alternative method of tracking your business transactions, then a properly numbered invoice is not a necessity. However, as mentioned before, invoice regulation is very common in other countries – particularly those in the EU. Be sure to check the laws and regulations of any other country that you may be doing business with in order to stay compliant and avoid any trouble for you or your customers.

There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
Version numbers allow people providing support to ascertain exactly which code a user is running, so that they can rule out bugs that have already been fixed as a cause of an issue, and the like. This is especially important when a program has a substantial user community, especially when that community is large enough that the people providing technical support are not the people who wrote the code. The semantic meaning[1] of version.revision.change style numbering is also important to information technology staff, who often use it to determine how much attention and research they need to pay to a new release before deploying it in their facility. As a rule of thumb, the bigger the changes, the larger the chances that something might break (although examining the Changelog, if any, may reveal only superficial or irrelevant changes). This is one reason for some of the distaste expressed in the “drop the major release” approach taken by Asterisk et alia: now, staff must (or at least should) do a full regression test for every update.

To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.


The problem with breaking up chapters into separate stories is, then, when I go to export the book to ePUB, the entire book is no longer in one, continuous stream, so it will not export properly. Also, if there are any edits down the road, and there is text reflow, having chapters in separate stories opens up a HUGE can of worms for pagination! Any ideas?
I have now permanently “baked” the Inline Counter system into my InDesign defaults. With no documents open, I made a “Counter” CharStyle and a “Zero Footnote” ParStyle, with those crucial zero-level type size attributes, and selected them in the Document Footnote Options. I also added a blank space as a prefix and a period and a blank space as a suffix. Then I made a keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-F) for the Footnote/Counter. So now Inline Counters can be inserted anywhere and anytime with close to zero efforts.

Both the Collection Point ID and Artifact ID fields are bound properly and display those exact names in the property sheet under both control source and name. On the save button I have on the form, when I click on the event tab and the on click option I have event procedure and I click the […] option to open up the code builder and this is what I currently have:

Next we will look at scenario 2. The variation here is that Apex wants to start each year with anew sequence of numbers. Also, they want to include the year when displaying this number. We still use a DMax, but we need to add criteria to determine the year. So Apex needs to have a field in their table that indicates the date. Generally, such inquiries will have a date/time stamp to indicate when received or the user will input the date and time. So we will assume there is a field in record called InquiryDate. We will also add an Integer field named Sequence. On the form we will add a control bound to Sequence, but set its Visible property to No. The line of code will look like this:
Open your Endnote Options dialog box by clicking Type>Endnote Options. In the Numbering section change the Mode drop-down box from Continuous to Restart Every Story, and in the Positioning Options section change the Scope drop-down box from Document to Story. Next you’ll need to separate your chapters into stories. Assuming that all the text frames in your document are currently linked, you’ll need to unlink them between chapters. Use the StorySplitter script to do this, and you can read how to do it here on InDesign Secrets.

You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the number of copies each time I print? Hi you could record a macro while doing this manually and assign a shortcut or button to this recorded macro -- Regards Frank Kabel Frankfurt, Germany Hebert45 wrote: > I need 2 copies to be printed each time I print from a certain file. > Is there any way to save this command so I don't have to change the > number of copies each time I print? ...

Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
Regarding exporting to EPUB, I have very limited experience in that department! I understood that InDesign compiles the EPUB using text and image frames in the order they appear in the document? So that chapter 2 would naturally follow chapter 1, and so on? If each chapter is in a separate document and all chapters are linked together using the Book feature, I think you can export to EPUB in a similar way that you can export to PDF?
NCR (no carbon required) or carbonless forms, like the name suggests, have eliminated the need for carbon paper between sheets to create multiple copies of the same form. The paper is chemically treated to transfer the impression from the first page to the subsequent pages with very little pressure. This works because the bottom side of carbonless NCR paper is coated with micro-encapsulated dye that breaks when pressed. The top of the susequent sheet is coated with clay that reacts with the dye to form a permanent mark. When the top sheet is written on, the pressure causes the micro-capsules to break and release the dye onto the page beneath it.
A few days ago I updated Lightroom to version 4.3. Since then, the "auto save to xmp" doesn't work. It is checked, but I keep finding files that "have been changed recently". So not only that it's not auto-saving them, but it is also finding "new images" that "have been recently changed" even though I didn't open or edited them in the past several months..
Hi, this is a great write up. I am very new to InDesign and i print onto a range of products and my first order with sequential numbering came up (serial numbers), I have the template made in illustrator and i also have the numbers added (00001 on all of the art work). A friend told me InDesign has a function for automatically incrasing the numbers by 1 for each art work. I have 105 pieces per template, is there a way to import the design and then sort the number (already text edible) and then save as a pdf then send to print?
Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.
Set up a matrix in Excel, one column for each ticket position (stack) and one row for each sheet, plus one for field names. Fill the first column down in consecutive order, then the second, starting where the first column leaves off, and so on. Afet a couple of columns are filled, you can auto fill across the rows, too, so the whole thing takes only a couple of minutes. Name the stacks and use a different field for each position on the page when you do the merge. The trick is to set up using a custom file for the total number of tickets or whatever, divided into the correct number of stacks and sheets.
Numbers works in a fashion somewhat different from traditional spreadsheets like Microsoft Excel or Lotus 1-2-3. In the traditional model, the table is the first-class citizen of the system, acting as both the primary interface for work, as well as the container for other types of media like charts or digital images. In effect, the spreadsheet and the table are one and the same. In contrast, Numbers uses a separate “canvas” as its basic container object, and tables are among the many objects that can be placed within the canvas.[4][N 1]

Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.

There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
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