You would need to use Photoshop scripting actions can not do what you want to do. You could print them on roll paper with a script like my paste image roll or build that process into your script. Create large documents with many sequenced tickets laided out in them. The steps are the same steps yod would use in an action however you can use locic to update the sequence number in the setial text layer and position the tickets location.  You need to code in one of three supported scripting language. Javascript is the best choice. you fo not meed to have a dialog like pasteimagerollm Rou most likely want to have a ticket template file that your scrip opens and loop update its serial and paste mintp pace into your print document.  You can look at my pastimageroll script to see how to tile you ticket image into a document.
Add specific codes to coupons to track customer responses     Use different codes for your different marketing messages, advertisements, or promotions. These codes will enable you to keep track of how customers learned about your offer. The more you learn about who is drawn to your business and what attracts customers' attention, the better you can focus future marketing efforts.
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Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
Great article. I’m working on a book project with both footnotes and endnotes. Long story, but I had to insert the endnotes manually into each Indesign chapter/file, so they weren’t imported using your method. Nevertheless, InDesign created the nifty text file for my references at the end of each chapter. I found though, when I cut and pasted each text to a single Appendix page in a separate document in the book, the reference numbers disappear from the originating chapter. Can you clarify what I’m doing wrong?
Hi – are you creating your own tickets using the instructions on this page? If so, you can of course change the font and everything else in your Word document. If you are using the Raffle Ticket Creator app (app.raffleticketcreator.com) then you can’t change the font size … you’ll just need to tinker with the exact words that you are including in order to get them to fit on the page. Hope that helps!
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I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.

Typically the second option of saving as a CSV file is the one to choose for use with Data Merge. Click the create button to choose a file name and location, make sure that a header has been assigned and click OK. This creates the CSV file that contains the sequential numbers that can then be used in a Data Merge by opening the Data Merge palette, clicking the flyout and clicking Select Data Source…
Hi Nick, unfortunately InDesign CC2018 doesn’t support live endnotes when using the Book feature. So if your chapters are in separate documents and you’re trying to add the endnotes to your back matter (in another separate document), live endnotes won’t work. I think that’s why your reference numbers are disappearing. The live endnote feature doesn’t work across documents, only within one document, so you’ll need to place the endnotes at the end of each document to keep them live.
I am trying to create a macro for outlook 2016 appointments that would add a number sequentially each time the appointment template was opened. I need to run this under public user so as others open it will give next number. Thank you in adance here is form Sequential Number Here Outside Assignment #: Click here to enter text. Court Reporter Needed: Click here to enter text. Job Type: Click here to enter text. Referral: Click here to enter text. Assignment Date: Click here to enter a date. Contact: Click here to enter text. Time: Click here to enter text.… Read more »

You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
You won’t use any of the standard List Number styles for SEQ field numbering. You need to create your own style if you want correct indentation and alignment with the tab position of the first word after the number. In this example, I’ll create a new style called Step Number, but you can call it whatever you want. In this example, I’ve also used the default settings for tab and hanging indent positions — you can change these later if you want.
The Renumber/Refresh List toolbar command is used to renumber an existing numbered list or to refresh a list after editing. For example if item 3. is deleted from a list by editing then you can use this tool to refresh the list. You can also use the Renumber/Refresh command to number or renumber a selection of list paragraphs with any chosen starting number.
Standard sizes for NCR forms are half page (5.5″ x 8.5″), full page (8.5″ x 11″) and legal (8.5″ x 14″) although custom sizes can be ordered to meet your specific need. The design orientation can be either vertical or horizontal. The link below gives you access to design templates that can be used to lay out your form in the appropriate size and orientation.
A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
Adobe’s 2018 update for InDesign includes a great new feature for book designers—live InDesign endnotes. Until now, footnotes and endnotes could be imported from Word to InDesign, but only footnotes continued to be live and linked, allowing us to insert and delete them without messing up the numbering system. Now we have the same flexibility with endnotes!
I'm making a research report on landscape design. The final document would have perhaps pages like 80-90 or so. Earlier I used to make reports and multipage documents on MS Word. While making the contents page, I would have to look at each and every chapter's name, subheading and then add the page number manually. Is there any automatic system in InDesign?

OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.


Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:

In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.


Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.

I want to a sequential number to fill in automatically each time the form is filled out. Malissa, A simple way would be to use something like this, you could assign it to a button, an open or before print event. Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A1").Value = _ Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A1").Value + 1 For other ways to do this or if this is going to be used in a temple have a look here http://www.mcgimpsey.com/excel/udfs/sequentialnums.html -- Paul B Always backup your data before trying something new Please post any response to the newsgroups so others...
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The sequential numbers required for the stationery are typically prepared in a spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel and then exported as a txt or csv file for use with the Data Merge palette. However, a free script called Indys Number Generator written by Stanislav Antos can create sequential numbers without having to open any spreadsheet software. The script has been available for some time but I feel it is a hidden gem and definitely worth discussing.
Step 4: Go to your coupons, page 1. Select the first text box (Command + Shift + Click to release from master page) and paste. The numbers will populate all of the boxes on that page (0001-0008). Now, here's where I'm not sure if I have a plugin doing this or not. The document should add pages to correspond to all of the numbers you have. If it doesn't (and it's doing it on mine because of a plugin), you can select the little red plus in the bottom right text box, add a page and hold down the shift key when pasting into the top left text box of page 2. That will add pages as needed.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.
Thanks for the quick reply, I think I’m a little confused by the Display aspect of this. Artifact ID is a primary key to the table I am working in and I need it to have a unique identifier that other people can search for. The previously adopted naming convention for this ID is that which I mentioned before, Collection Point ID plus a period and then a sequential number restarting at each new Collection Point ID i.e 2-1050.1, 2-1050.2, 2-1060.1 and so on. So I think I actually need to save this in the Artifact ID field. I realize this might be slightly redundant but I’m not sure how the display would work as far as searching for specific Artifact IDs in the future.
I have a document where in I have to make two kinds of page numbering, A catalog (individually made) which should always start at page 1, and the other is a compiled version where the pages should be a continuous page. They both have the same content but with different output so I tried using layers, but fail to set the page numbering to auto. because setting them would affect both layers.
The sequential numbers required for the stationery are typically prepared in a spreadsheet such as Microsoft Excel and then exported as a txt or csv file for use with the Data Merge palette. However, a free script called Indys Number Generator written by Stanislav Antos can create sequential numbers without having to open any spreadsheet software. The script has been available for some time but I feel it is a hidden gem and definitely worth discussing.
I use a template for all my drawings that includes a page number in the lower right hand corner (usually says "Page 1 of 4" for example). I usually edit this number manually, which is fine for documents with a small amount of pages, but if I'm working on a large document (50+ pages) and need to re-order some pages it means editing the page number on every page manually.
Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.

No matter how light the file might be, if you need 1000 units, that means you send a 1000-page file to the printer if you use Data Merge, that is not as efficient as sending one page and 1000 numbers to insert in the print stream, but to do that you need a plugin, which is what that page Bob directed you is leading up to. I've never used the program Harbs has mentioned, but he's a pretty smart guy and if he says it works well, I'd take a look.
I also use InDesign. An Excel file for numbering is easy to create. Then find DataMerge under Automate to link the data file. When you are ready to export, use the create PDF right on the Datamerge window. You can print as cut / stack on the Fiery (or CREO). REMEMBER - if your customer wants them stapled into books of 6 (for example) each stack has to be divisible by 6 if you are going to staple then cut into individual books.

Can anyone tell me what the maximum no. of worksheets is in Excel? Ton From Help...Limited by available memory (default is 3) -- HTH Nick Hodge Microsoft MVP - Excel Southampton, England nick_hodgeTAKETHISOUT@zen.co.uk.ANDTHIS "Ton" wrote in message news:EB5EE739-9250-4D83-AA7C-EE82C02C0AA3@microsoft.com... > Can anyone tell me what the maximum no. of worksheets is in Excel? The maximum number only depends on the amount of memory available. -- Best Regards Leo Heuser Followup to newsgroup only please. "Ton"
Typically the second option of saving as a CSV file is the one to choose for use with Data Merge. Click the create button to choose a file name and location, make sure that a header has been assigned and click OK. This creates the CSV file that contains the sequential numbers that can then be used in a Data Merge by opening the Data Merge palette, clicking the flyout and clicking Select Data Source…

Layout your ticket in InDesign, one on each page, using the Page Number function to number the tickets. If you have something like Imposer Pro (I know it doesn't work from InDesign CS3) you can, for instance, impose the pages 4up consecutive and get 4 tickets on an A4. Alternatively, make a PDF of the whole document and impose (manually, if you have to), the advantage here is that this can work as a template for other tickets, simply make a new PDF of the same size and update the PDF in the template document every time you have a new raffle ticket to do.
Rhonda, Thank you for your amazingly quick and thorough reply! You are correct, Word does the Table and Figure numbering splendidly. I was trying to reference those numbers in the text, which I see is a function done quite well in Word using Cross Reference: ‘In Word 2007 and 2010: Display the References tab. In the Captions group, click on the Cross-reference button.’ Thanks again, Joshua.

In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
I need a way for the priority level to automatically adjust when I add or change an item with a new priority level. I might have 6 tasks, each will have a different priority. If I add one and set it to 1, the others need to increment + by one digit. Adding one to the above the highest would see no change in the others. Adding one in the middle would spread the rest apart (e.g. I have a 3, I put a new record and put it at 3, the old 3 becomes 4, and so on (everything below it would increment one digit).
I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.

Warning  Making even minor changes to an outline numbering scheme won't necessarily change the initial position you've selected in the gallery, but rather may create a new gallery position, overwriting an existing one. Because of this problem, attaching numbering to styles is strongly recommended. This is covered in greater detail later in this chapter and in the chapter on Styles.
If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
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