It's easy to enter a SEQ field manually. Begin by pressing [Ctrl]+[F9]. When Word displays the blank field, enter seq list1, as shown in Figure A. List1 is a required argument; you can use any descriptive name you like as long as it begins with an alpha character. The parentheses distinguish the numbers within the text. They're not part of the field code. Highlight the field code and press [F9] to display the field's value. As you can see in Figure B, the first field returns (1).
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
I want to a sequential number to fill in automatically each time the form is filled out. Malissa, A simple way would be to use something like this, you could assign it to a button, an open or before print event. Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A1").Value = _ Sheets("Sheet1").Range("A1").Value + 1 For other ways to do this or if this is going to be used in a temple have a look here http://www.mcgimpsey.com/excel/udfs/sequentialnums.html -- Paul B Always backup your data before trying something new Please post any response to the newsgroups so others...
All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.

* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
* The solution assumes that there is only one stack to cut, but really there could be dozens of stacks. Take a run of the numbers 1-10000 for example. Let’s say you get 4-up on a sheet and the biggest stack that will fit in the guillotine is 500 sheets. A true cut and stack solution will print on the first stack 1-500, 501-1000, 1001-1500, 1501-2000. Ideal because the numbers can be guillotined and placed back onto a pallet for its next process. It also means I can provide these numbers first to the client and then they can wait for the other numbers (in case they had run out of stock and were in a hurry for replenishment stock). The solution doesn’t do that – instead, the first 500 stack will have the numbers 1-500, 2501-3000, 5001-5500, 7501-8000. That means not only is placement back onto the pallet confusing, but the customer has to wait for the artwork to be completely printed before even getting the first half of numbers. True, I could run the script several times to get the appropriate stacks, but why should I if the script did what I wanted? Especially if there are hundreds of stacks to print?
If you work in a business where you need to sequentially number items, you might be wondering if there is a way you can use Word to create the labels for you. Word has many ways you can implement some type of numbering in your documents. For instance, you can use different fields for numbering, or use numbered lists, the captioning feature, or you can use mail merging. While all of these features (and more) use some type of numbering in them, they are not all well suited to creating labels.
Ah, that’s the con – this works beautifully when you are in fact exporting data but when you are viewing the query’s output in a datasheet or a form, as you scroll around, Access will be re-evaluating the rows, including a call to the RowNumber(). But when it repeatedly calls RowNumber(), of course it keeps incrementing blindly, without any regards to whether a number was already generated for that row.

When you’ve finished typesetting your book, you’ll create an appropriate page or pages in the back matter for your endnotes. When you have a spot ready to go, find your endnotes text frame (it might still be on the pasteboard of page 2 or 4), and cut-and-paste it to the appropriate page in your back matter. Note that the endnotes text frame can be copied- or cut-and-pasted without losing any live links. Isn’t technology grand?


Footnotes, after all, are always numbered sequentially and update when you add or remove one. The problem is that each time you add a footnote you get an extra space down at the bottom of the column. The solution? Make a paragraph style for your footnotes that specifies a .1 pt tall size with a 0 (zero) leading, then choose that paragraph style in the Document Footnote Options dialog box.
Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
You may be familiar to view multiple webpages in Firefox/Chrome/IE, and switch between them by clicking corresponding tabs easily. Here, Office Tab supports similar processing, which allow you to browse multiple Excel workbooks or Word documents in one Excel window or Word window, and easily switch between them by clicking their tabs. Click for free trial of Office Tab!
Hi Tara, Thanks for sharing your observations! I agree that breaking your chapters into separate text frames is not the ideal way to go, but is only useful if you must have live endnotes at the end of each chapter rather than at the back of the book. One alternative in this scenario is to create a separate InDesign document for each chapter, then use the Book feature to tie them all together. Whether your chapters are in separate text frames or in separate documents, you’ll still need to be very vigilant with any changes to the flow of text to make sure the pagination is okay.

If you’re producing any kind of numbered items in-house that are multiple-up on a sheet where you need to control all the variables to meet your production needs, the autonumbering feature through numbered lists is the way to go! Just step and repeat away & InDesign will do all the work. No need to fool with a seperate “numbers” file or deal with a data merged document. I think it’s by far the best option for basic numbering.
You would need to use Photoshop scripting actions can not do what you want to do. You could print them on roll paper with a script like my paste image roll or build that process into your script. Create large documents with many sequenced tickets laided out in them. The steps are the same steps yod would use in an action however you can use locic to update the sequence number in the setial text layer and position the tickets location.  You need to code in one of three supported scripting language. Javascript is the best choice. you fo not meed to have a dialog like pasteimagerollm Rou most likely want to have a ticket template file that your scrip opens and loop update its serial and paste mintp pace into your print document.  You can look at my pastimageroll script to see how to tile you ticket image into a document.

Running captions number figures, tables, and other items consecutively in a document. For example, the first figure caption starts with the words “Figure 1,” the second with “Figure 2,” and so on. To make sure that figures, tables, or similar items are numbered consecutively, define a list for the item, and then create a paragraph style that includes the list definition. You can also add descriptive words such as “Figure” or “Table” to the numbering scheme of the paragraph style.


See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
If you know in advance that you need outline numbering for your paragraphs, you will want to choose the correct format from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. Applying one of the preset formats to a paragraph or paragraphs that are already bulleted or numbered applies it to the entire list. There is a specific tab for outline numbers — the Outlined Numbered tab.
I am printing many pages of tickets. Each page has 5 tickets and I would like to sequentially put a number on each ticket. I have tried to use the auto page numbering feature but that is putting the same number on each of the 5 tickets and then increments for the next page -- not what I need. Also, can the numbering not suppress the leading zeroes? Thanks.
It will ask for the number of copies that you want to make and sequentially number each copy.The first time this macro runs, the first copy will be numbered 1 and when it finishes running, it will store in aSettings.Txt file the number that is one more that the number on the last copy.The next time the macro is run, it will start numbering the copies from that number. If when you first start, you want the numbers to start at some number other than 1, run the macro, entering 1 as the number of copies and then open Settings.Txt file and replace the number in the file with the number that you want as the first in the series.At any time thereafter, if you want the series to start at a particular number, you can open that file and replace the number in it with the number that you want to be the first in the series.
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