we have printed AP checks using the check number from 0000000001 to 0000000006, but we havent posted those batches. we have only one checbook. Now can we restart the check number from 000001. Then do we need to delete the previous batches for checks printed. What is the best approach in this regard. Thanks in Advance, Arun. In the Post Payables Checks batch window (Transactions > Purchasing > Post Checks), choose the batch in question, then select Reprint Checks from the drop-down list. Enter 000001 for your starting check number. You will also need to go ...
Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.
Footnotes, after all, are always numbered sequentially and update when you add or remove one. The problem is that each time you add a footnote you get an extra space down at the bottom of the column. The solution? Make a paragraph style for your footnotes that specifies a .1 pt tall size with a 0 (zero) leading, then choose that paragraph style in the Document Footnote Options dialog box.
OK, so what didn’t you understand in my blog? The blog contains instructions on how to deal with this. It tells you that you do not want an LH Identifier field. It tells you that all you need is to add a Sequence field to store the Sequential number. It tells you how to base that number on the current year so it restarts with the new year, Finally it tells you how to combine the year and the sequence # with whatever else you need to display the LH identifier. These instructions are all detailed in the blog.
Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
Joshua, I described this problem in my post #5 — the footnote settings are doc-global. I know no present solution to your problem — which is why we still need Adobe to code a counter! And we also need to be able to set up footnotes which are frame-wide, not just column-wide. And, natch, we need headings which are frame-wide, spanning multiple columns — so the ID engineers can’t retire quite yet. :-)
This will work OK for a small set of data, but the more data there is, the more intensive the subquery becomes, and it must be called repeatedly for each row. This is one of those rare cases where doing it in VBA is faster than doing it in SQL — after all, row numbering is fundamentally iterative, not set-based which just goes against the grain of what SQL was designed to do – solve a problem in a set-based fashion, non-iterative fashion.
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It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
Klaus Nordby, one of our good-natured Norwegian hecklers, has produced a ray of sunshine in the midst of a deep, dark Scandanavian winter by coming up with a wonderful little trick involving adding sequential numbers inside a paragraph. For example, 1. this is the first clause of this sentence; 2. this is the second; and 3. this is the third. That’s not a big deal to type, of course, but if you had dozens of them and you needed to insert or remove numbering frequently, doing it manually would be a hassle.
Before you complete the merge, preview the merge results to make sure that the tracking numbers will display as you want them to in your publications. You can preview the merge in two ways: While you are refining the layout to review the layout of the individual coupon or gift certificate, or when you are getting ready to print, to preview the arrangement of coupons or gift certificates on the printed sheet.
Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.

Joshua, I described this problem in my post #5 — the footnote settings are doc-global. I know no present solution to your problem — which is why we still need Adobe to code a counter! And we also need to be able to set up footnotes which are frame-wide, not just column-wide. And, natch, we need headings which are frame-wide, spanning multiple columns — so the ID engineers can’t retire quite yet. :-)
All I want to know is, how do you link fields, like {SEQ}, to a style – so that if I select/apply style “Figure Caption” (my style, I also have “Table Caption”), I get not just the attributes of the style (what it looks like, where it is on the page etc.) but I get a chapter (or section) number + a sequence number added, (e.g. “2-3”). I know about STYLEREF and SEQ Figure # and/or calling a section number (if required) – but I can’t find out how to take the simple and to me obvious step to have sequential numbering (prefixed with either “Figure” or “Table”) attached to my Figure Caption style. It all seems to be a two-step process: (i) select the style, (ii) select the numbering. I want to do both at style level. I want to see/get (e.g.) “Figure 2-3: Linking figure numbering to styles” just by applying my “Figure Caption” style to my figure caption text “Linking figure numbering to styles”. Please, only tell me how to do that, how to link chapter/sequence numbering via a style – i.e. in just one step – applying the style.
The system that you choose for numbering your invoices should correspond to your most prominent needs to make it as easy as possible for invoices to be located for referencing, and the sequence number must always be last to help you keep track and avoid duplication. Lots of accounting software provides an invoice number generator to help with this task.
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
I have a table named Artifact Catalog in which there is a field Collection Point ID and a field Artifact ID. On the form I have created the user will input the Collection Point ID, for example: 2-1050. I need to find a way to have this Collection Point ID automatically generate a corresponding Artifact ID, i.e when you click the save button the first record under Artifact ID becomes: 2-1050.1 and the second becomes 2-1050.2 and so on.
So, if you wanted to use this idea in a form or datasheet, let me stop and first remind you – if this is going to be non-updatable, you can just embed a report as a subreport within a form and thus use Running Sum. But let’s discuss the case where you need to be able to edit data in the forms, even with sequential numbering generated for the data you are viewing. This means we need to be able to tie a sequential number to a specific row.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.

Word includes a special sequencing field that you can use to do all sorts of numbering. You can even use the SEQ field to help create broken numbered lists. (A broken numbered list is one in which the flow of the list is interrupted by paragraphs of a different format.) This approach to creating numbered lists is particularly helpful and much less prone to the problems inherent in Word's built-in list numbering. For the purposes of this tip, the format of the sequence field is as follows:

Both the Collection Point ID and Artifact ID fields are bound properly and display those exact names in the property sheet under both control source and name. On the save button I have on the form, when I click on the event tab and the on click option I have event procedure and I click the […] option to open up the code builder and this is what I currently have:
It will ask for the number of copies that you want to make and sequentially number each copy.The first time this macro runs, the first copy will be numbered 1 and when it finishes running, it will store in aSettings.Txt file the number that is one more that the number on the last copy.The next time the macro is run, it will start numbering the copies from that number. If when you first start, you want the numbers to start at some number other than 1, run the macro, entering 1 as the number of copies and then open Settings.Txt file and replace the number in the file with the number that you want as the first in the series.At any time thereafter, if you want the series to start at a particular number, you can open that file and replace the number in it with the number that you want to be the first in the series.
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