Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.
Using the instructions in #5, add an incrementing SEQ field. You can highlight any of them, except the reset field. For step 7, enter n}. n is the default switch that inserts the next number in the sequence, making it easy to remember. You don't have to specify the \n switch, because it's the default, but you can add it if it helps document your choice.
Important: A new label is saved ONLY on the computer where it was created (in Word's local Normal template). It cannot be exchanged with the document. This means that everyone who wants to use the label needs to re-create it on their local computer. Therefore the decision to use customised labels should be taken on the workgroup level and well communicated to everyone involved.
I know that PrintShopMail will do it, but I was wandering if there was a less expensive solution out there so that I could get numbered tickets (usually 4-up) right off the Xerox. I just want to avoid having to go the the Windmill after trimming and doing it the old fashion way. There is a tiny little copy shop here in town that is doing it, and am willing to bet that they are not using PrintShopMail, but I'm also not going to ask them to share their methods with a competitor. There has to be cheaper solution. I know that I can do it with auto page numbering in Indesign, but that means I can only print raffle tickets 1-up which wont work.
This chapter (web page) takes you through how numbering is supposed to work in Word and the various controls. It is useful, but primarily on SEQ fields and simple numbered lists and also as reference showing the menus, dialogs and controls and going through the concepts for outline numbering. To actually set up outline numbering that works, refer to the Kelly and McGhie articles.
There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.
In the example I explained, I was using a list, but did it with un-linked text boxes using “continue from previous number” and “continue numbers across stories.” I’m guessing that there is no way to tell InDesign that even though there are 4 text boxes on the page, that there are two different lists? I’d probably have to just create two threaded stories for that scenario to work.
Great article. I’m working on a book project with both footnotes and endnotes. Long story, but I had to insert the endnotes manually into each Indesign chapter/file, so they weren’t imported using your method. Nevertheless, InDesign created the nifty text file for my references at the end of each chapter. I found though, when I cut and pasted each text to a single Appendix page in a separate document in the book, the reference numbers disappear from the originating chapter. Can you clarify what I’m doing wrong?

2. In Word 2007 & later, if you put the macro into your 'Capital_Unit_Certificate' document, you'll need to save the document in the docm format and you'll need to enable macros whenever you open the document if you want to print the certificate. Alternatively, if you add the macro to Word's 'Normal' template, the macro will always be available (to you only) an you can keep the document in it's docx format - plus you won't get macro warnings every time you open it.
I am curently working on a larger projekt, where we have aprox. 4500 pcs.of furnituer designed in 4 different kind of families, generic, furnituer, furnituer systems and specialty equipment. We need to be able to asign every  pcs.of funituer a seqventual serial number, we have tried to do this using an extension with a funktion called element positionerning, but we have had no success with this tool, apparently it is taking up to much memory.
In this system, the third number (instead of the second) denotes a minor release, and a fourth number (instead of the third) denotes bug-fix/revision releases.[23] Because the first number is always 10, and because the subsequent numbers are not decimal, but integer values, the 11th major version of OS X is labeled “10.10” (rather than 11.0). This number scheme continues above point-10, with Apple releasing macOS 10.13 in 2017.[24]
Hi Tara, Thanks for sharing your observations! I agree that breaking your chapters into separate text frames is not the ideal way to go, but is only useful if you must have live endnotes at the end of each chapter rather than at the back of the book. One alternative in this scenario is to create a separate InDesign document for each chapter, then use the Book feature to tie them all together. Whether your chapters are in separate text frames or in separate documents, you’ll still need to be very vigilant with any changes to the flow of text to make sure the pagination is okay.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
The first number in this identifier is the date, followed by the customer number, and the unique sequence number. The last number is important if you have multiple invoices for the same customer on the same date – in that case, the next invoice would be numbered 05232017-4602-01. The date format can be selected from a variety of options as well. The example above uses the DDMMYYYY format, but alternate options include MMDDYYYY, DDMMYY, YYYYDDMM, or YYDDMM, among others.
There are a couple of ways you can set up Word 2007/2010 to use SEQ fields for numbering — you can set them up as AutoCorrect entries or as Quick Parts. Both ways work; the method you choose is up to you. This long article describes how to create the SEQ fields and the numbering style in your Normal.dotm template; how to save the SEQ fields as AutoCorrect entries in Word 2007/2010 (and how to use them); and how to save (and use) them as Quick Parts. The most consuming part of this process is settings up the fields and the style; once they’re set up, using them is super easy.
If you are thinking of using sequential numbering, please give our printing experts a call for helpful advice on how to best set up your artwork. We offer ready to use templates for the most common types of forms including invoice templates, statement templates, work order templates and purchase order templates. Just upload your logo and contact information and let us know how you would like to number your forms.
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