If you make a list of things you need to do, starting with number 1 and continuing until all your tasks are accounted for, then you’ve made a sequential list. Something that is sequential often follows a numerical or alphabetical order, but it can also describe things that aren’t numbered but still need to take place in a logical order, such as the sequential steps you follow for running a program on your computer.
By omitting the dbFailOnError parameter only for the DROP TABLE statement, we won’t get a runtime error about a table not existing but get runtime errors if we can’t create the table or insert data for some reasons. I’m also not a big fan of creating multiple saved queries that are meant to be logically grouped together – it gets quite cluttered when there are several saved queries in a navigation pane like that. Keeping it all in VBA makes it clearer that the intention is to execute those statements together.

With this expression we check only for records that are in the same year as the Inquiry date to increment the sequence. Again, the NZ function will automatically restart the sequence with each year. Cleary, though, we cannot generate this number until the InquiryDate has been entered. Is this value is a user entry, then you may want to check that it’s filled in before generating the number. Something like:
Instead of working harder than you need to, insert a one-column table with as many rows as necessary to accommodate your list. Then, using Word's numbering feature, number that column. Finally, convert the table to text. The resulting list is a fixed numbered list, so you'll have to live with its limitations; when you can do so, this method definitely beats most alternative solutions.
Note this works only because we create a brand new table, add an autonumber column to it as well any other columns we need then insert records into it. It’ll be contiguous – as long we don’t delete any records from the table. Unfortunately, creating a brand new table every time we run this will result in bloat of the Access file – if you can do it in a separate Access file, all the better so that you can compact it when you need to.
Sequential numbers can be printed almost anywhere on a sheet or form and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. Numbers can also be repeated in another position on the form. When developing your artwork, consider putting a box for numbering, making it easier for your customers or employees to find and reference a specific job or transaction. You may also differentiate your number by color. Most printers allow a choice of colors, typically black or red, to make your number stand out. Start your sequencing at any point you like, to pick up where you left off on your last print order.
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