I would like to number a voucher book, i have place 4 vouchers on a page, the thing is that i want each of these vouchers to start with different number, 100, 200, 300, 400, and then i want to number them 99 times. The problem is that they have to be numbered only 1 per page, so that when i have printed them all i can easily crop them and staple them right up with having to go through it all.
Scott, I was able to try this as I assumed that is what I needed to do. It does not work. First, the current macro for that button is a Save Record, Close Window operation. How could I keep this and also add Code? If I just add a new button to the form and under the On Click Event put the code you suggested, I get a compile error of “method or data member not found” and ” .txtPROJECT” is highlighted. The actual field is “PROJECT ID#” and it is a long integer number. Entry I have is: Private Sub Command88_Click()
So if you encountered this problem, then you didn’t follow the instructions completely (which is OK) and appear to be automatically generating the number whenever the record is accessed. If that’s the case, then you are risking duplication because you are not saving the generated number immediately. Rather then try to test if a number already exists as you seem to be doing, you should not automatically generate the number, but trigger the generation from some action in the form.

The blog is pretty much step by step. Where it may not be that specific is, because, these are decisions the developer needs to make. For example, where to put the DMax expression is a matter of your workflow so I can’t tell you where to put it. I’ve given tips in the blog to help you decide. If you are having issues, then please give me more info about your application and I can suggest things.


I have a table named Artifact Catalog in which there is a field Collection Point ID and a field Artifact ID. On the form I have created the user will input the Collection Point ID, for example: 2-1050. I need to find a way to have this Collection Point ID automatically generate a corresponding Artifact ID, i.e when you click the save button the first record under Artifact ID becomes: 2-1050.1 and the second becomes 2-1050.2 and so on.
Both the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland use sequential numbering systems, with the junction number indicated by a white number in a black square in the corner of signs. In the United Kingdom they are frequently referenced in the media as the number with "J" on front of it, with for example Junction 1 being referred to as "J1". If a junction is newly constructed to between two existing junctions, it is normally allocated the number of the lower of the two junctions, with the letter "A" attached (and so on). For example, a new junction opened between junctions 3 and 4 would become Junction 3A.
Search sequential numbering and thousands of other words in English Cobuild dictionary from Reverso. You can complete the definition of sequential numbering given by the English Cobuild dictionary with other English dictionaries : Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Oxford, Cambridge, Chambers Harrap, Wordreference, Collins Lexibase dictionaries, Merriam Webster ...
If you use the Form Wizard, controls will be named with the field name the control is bound to. But that name can be changed. This trips up a lot of people because my code samples use a naming convention that is not what is automatically generated. So you just need to make sure you use the correct name for the object. The name is shown in the Name property on the Other tab (Not the Caption property). To determine what field in your table the control is bound to check the ControlSource property. It should be bound to the PONum field.
What I actually want to do, is say I go out and shoot 100 images, and I want to number them 1 to 100 so I can send them to the client and they can respond back with the number of the images they like, for instance, "Give me 21, 45, 68, and 77" as an example.  Is there a way to batch process a folder of images to sequentially number them individually, or do I have to painstakingly number them one at a time?

Search sequential numbering and thousands of other words in English Cobuild dictionary from Reverso. You can complete the definition of sequential numbering given by the English Cobuild dictionary with other English dictionaries : Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Oxford, Cambridge, Chambers Harrap, Wordreference, Collins Lexibase dictionaries, Merriam Webster ...
I’m not sure which version of InDesign first introduced printing Thumbnails like this, but even if yours doesn’t support that, your printer driver may have a similar feature of its own. Check the printer’s own dialog box by clicking “Setup…” near the bottom left corner of the Print dialog and dismissing the warning, then clicking “Preferences…” in Windows’s Print dialog that comes up (I’m not sure how to access this on Mac OS X, but I’m pretty sure there’s an easy way). For instance, on many HP printers, the feature you want is called “Pages per sheet” and has a drop-down offering 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 pages per sheet.
Typos can easily occur, and spelling errors in the company name or other more trivial information on the invoice doesn’t necessarily require correcting. If the invoice number contains an error, though, failing to correct it may prove painful. A general rule of thumb in accounting is that finalized invoices should never be deleted, so when correcting an error it’s recommended to create a new invoice with the correct information and send that to your customer along with a note of correction, so that evidence of the correction can accompany all of the evidence in both your books and the books of your customer, therefore avoiding any future confusion. If the customer has already paid, make a correction adjustment on a future invoice, or issue another invoice or credit correcting the mistake.

Now, what’s the deal with the UniqueKeyVariant parameter for the RowNumber() function? We are not even using it all! True, but if we didn’t, Access will call RowNumber() only once for an entire query and thus we get “1” for the entire dataset. That is a good way to save on CPU processing – why call Now() for each row? In this case, we want to go against this CPU-saving measure and ensure that the RowNumber() is in fact called once per row to generate a new number for that row. Thus, we pass in a parameter — a primary key of a table is a good choice for this purpose. So we get a nice sequential number generated all in the query with VBA function.

Being able to give your files sequential numbers is all very well but file names like document1, document2 etc. are not exactly very descriptive are they? I use BulkRename (free) which allows you to add and or remove prefixes and postfixes and indeed other info to your selected file names. For example if you want to replace all underscores (_) in a filename with spaces, all you do is this: In Group 3 simply enter an underscore in the Replace box, and enter a space in the With box. Then highlight all your filenames (mouse, keyboard, Ctrl+A etc.). In the “New Name” column you will see what the new name is going to look like, for each and every file you have selected. The rest of the boxes are all very similar. The number beside each box merely denotes the sequence in which they are processed. For example, the program will make any replacements (Group 3) before it changes case (Group 4). The only real exception to the above rules is Group 12. This governs which files/folders are going to be displayed on the screen. The interface can look a bit bewildering when you first see it but once you calm down and actually start looking at the boxes, it all becomes crystal clear!
Occasionally we come across project requirements that include the ability to do sequential numbering in Access on a set of data. We cannot just use the auto-number data type because there is no promise of sequentiality but only uniqueness. In other words, if someone creates a record then later deletes it, there will be a gap in the sequence. So, what are our options? There are actually several ways, each with its pros and cons.

You can change the numbers in the list by restarting the sequence or by specifying a new start number. You can change the list's style. You can do anything to this list that you can do to a normal numbered list because it is a numbered list, with one exception: the list, while easy to format, is fixed. If you delete an item, the list updates accordingly, but I haven't found a way to add numbers.
×