What I actually want to do, is say I go out and shoot 100 images, and I want to number them 1 to 100 so I can send them to the client and they can respond back with the number of the images they like, for instance, "Give me 21, 45, 68, and 77" as an example.  Is there a way to batch process a folder of images to sequentially number them individually, or do I have to painstakingly number them one at a time?
In the Republic of Ireland, junction numbers have existed since the opening of the first section of the M50 motorway in 1990, however due to the short length of Irish motorways until the early 2000s they were normally ignored by the general public. They are beginning to come into popular usage now, and since 2005 have been given greater prominence on road signs. With the development of the inter-urban motorway network under the National Development Plan and Transport 21, the National Roads Authority has adopted a numbering scheme for the inter-urban roads that will see Junction 1 being designated as that road's junction with the M50 in most cases. This has meant renumbering of existing junctions on some motorways, most notably the M7 motorway. Non-motorway dual carriageways forming part of major inter-urban roads also have junction numbers, however only grade-separated interchanges are numbered.
Most European countries use sequential numbering schemes. Spain uses distance-based numbering on its Autovias, but not on its Autopistas. Austria and the Czech Republic use distance-based schemes. A number of European countries (including the Netherlands, Belgium and France) do not number motorway intersections, apparently because one cannot "exit" the motorway there. Countries like Germany and Switzerland have attributed numbers to their exit, but instead of the usual exit symbol, they are given a specific interchange symbol.
Search sequential numbering and thousands of other words in English Cobuild dictionary from Reverso. You can complete the definition of sequential numbering given by the English Cobuild dictionary with other English dictionaries : Wikipedia, Lexilogos, Oxford, Cambridge, Chambers Harrap, Wordreference, Collins Lexibase dictionaries, Merriam Webster ...
There’s an old Steve Martin joke about how to make a million dollars which starts, “First, get a million dollars…” That’s the key to this trick, too: First, get a bunch of numbers. Here’s a file with 1,197 numbers in it. Now import or paste those numbers into a thread so that the numbers appear in the right place. If you need two matching numbers, just import it twice.
First, you have to use YOUR field and control names. The ones I use are samples. The error you are getting indicated you do not have a control named txtProject. So you have to substitute the correct name of the control. bound to the ProjectID field. By the way it is not a good idea to the octothorpe(#) as part of a field name. A controlname may be different from a fieldname. The name property of a control is on the Other tab in the Properties dialog.
For controlname you need to use the name of the control bound to your Project ID# field. However, the # may be complicating things. Type the Me. and Intellisense should give you a list of controls and methods. Press the P key to go to Ps and scroll until you find the controlname. Selecting the name from the Intellisense list will make sure you are using the correct control. That control needs to have a ControlSource of the Project ID# field. If you do this correctly, then pressing the button should populate the control with the next number. It will also save the record.
I have a table named Artifact Catalog in which there is a field Collection Point ID and a field Artifact ID. On the form I have created the user will input the Collection Point ID, for example: 2-1050. I need to find a way to have this Collection Point ID automatically generate a corresponding Artifact ID, i.e when you click the save button the first record under Artifact ID becomes: 2-1050.1 and the second becomes 2-1050.2 and so on.
WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (92) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Sequentially Numbering Elements in Your Document.
×