This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.

There are two ways to number the pages using the Book feature: manually or automatically. If you’ve set the starting page number in each document manually, those page numbers will appear in your Book file. There are, however, advantages to numbering your pages automatically. For example, say you decide to add a few pages to a chapter, or change your mind about the order of the chapters. With automatic page numbering, your Book file will adjust the page numbers accordingly whenever you make changes that affect the page numbering.
If you use Versions (File + Versions) to store multiple versions of a document within a single file, then it will only be a matter of time before your document corrupts and you lose all your work. Avoid this feature like the plague - and like Fast Save and Master Documents, which are similarly broken – unless the document is of no importance to you. Taking backups won't necessarily help, because the corruption may creep up on you gradually, and by the time you realise you have a corruption you may have to go back to a very old file to get a clean document.

Microsoft Publisher, the desktop publishing component of the Professional version of the Office Suite, can perform many time-saving tasks for busy business owners, including layout and design work. It can even help you avoid a shopping run to try to find tickets for your next employee picnic, holiday giveaway or executive board meeting. Create your own tickets, including the vital sequential ordering needed for raffles or attendance tracking, using Publisher’s page numbering. With a few tricky manipulations of the page number process, you can start running the numbers in an entirely new fashion.
I have been having an issue with adding automatic page numbering to my multipage document. After adding the numbering it is showing up behind my background and objects on the page. If the page is blank, the numbering works just fine. But if I have other images or objects on the page, it lingers behind them. No matter what I do, it will not move to front of the page/objects/images. If I try and group the numbering and the objects on the page to combine them on the same layer, the numbering disappears from all remaining pages but the one I am currently on. Any help would be appreciated.
The page number feature in WordPerfect® is very comprehensive. You can start by inserting a basic page number and progress to creating customized page numbers that include chapter and volume numbers. You can also create a custom page number with a combination of these numbers. For example, you might create a page number that shows the current page and the chapter number, or the current page and the total number of pages (also called “page x of y”).
Tip: Page numbers are printed on the top or bottom line in the text area of the page, not in the margin space. WordPerfect inserts a blank line to separate the page number from the rest of the document text. This reduces the amount of text that would normally fit on the page by two lines. If you decrease your top or bottom margin (depending on where you put the page numbers) to approximately 2/3 inch, you can regain the lost space, and the page numbers will appear to print in the margin space.
 Does anybody have an easy way to set up sequential numbering in Coreldraw? Our shop has to lay out unit number plaques for vinyl cutting and sometimes my employee has to manually type in hundreds of numbers. I've read all the print merge suggestions for raffle tickets and such but I need the numbers entered into an object and not during the print process. 

When the “Current Page Number” placeholder sits on a master page, every page to which you assigned that specific master page will display this variable – the number will change automatically on every page. If you change the style assigned to the placeholder on the master page (let’s say you set it to bold), all page numbers will update to that style (all numbers will become bold).

If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
You can control whether your next paragraph number continues the current sequence or starts again at 1 within that same right-click menu. If one of your numbers gets out of sequence, simply right-click and choose Continue Numbering. If you want to force the number back to the beginning (say, you’re switching from interrogatories to requests for production), choose Set Numbering Value (which will also give you the option of continuing the previous list).
Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
Look at the three choices under Options. The choices are Insert blank pages, Insert one text box on each page, and Duplicate all objects on page (you will have the option of inserting a page number inside the rectangle to the right of this option). If you want insert all blank pages, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert blank pages. If you want insert one text box on each page, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert one text box on each page. If you want duplicate all objects on a certain page, then click inside the small circle in front of Duplicate all objects on page. You will then need to type a number of the page you want to duplicate inside the rectangle to the right of Duplicate all objects on page.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

I answer readers' questions when I can, but there's no guarantee. Don't send files unless requested; initial requests for help that arrive with attached files will be deleted unread. You can send screenshots of your data to help clarify your question. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise when helping readers, nor do I ask for a fee from readers I help. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Another great thing about the Book feature is that it enables you to package all your digital files into one folder—InDesign files, linked images, fonts (if you are using any outside of TypeKit), and your Book file. Chapter 71 in Book Design Made Simple walks you step-by-step through packaging your files for print, and there is only a slight difference when you are working with a Book File: you’ll select all the documents in your Book file rather than just packaging one document.
You can't use Word's Numbering feature to generate a multilevel numbering system, even if you use built-in heading styles. Figure A shows a document with two styled heading levels: Heading 1 and Heading 2. You can apply the Numbering option (in the Paragraph group) and Word will number the headings consequently, but the feature ignores different levels; if you expected 1, 1.1, 2, 2.1, and 2.2, you might be surprised. If you select the entire document first, Numbering not only ignores the different levels, but it also numbers the paragraphs!
Click the plus sign at the bottom of the panel to open the Add Documents dialog box. Navigate to your chapter documents and select them all at once (select the first one, press Shift, then select the last one), then click Open. Now the documents will all be shown in your Book file. Save the Book file by clicking the Save the Book icon at the bottom of the panel (second from the left). Here is what our Book Design Made Simple panel looks like:
The Suppress feature is designed to prevent headers, footers, watermarks, and page numbers from printing on a particular page. Suppress is frequently used to keep these items from printing on a title page. Simply insert a Suppress code at the top of every page on which you do not want a page number to print. That’s it! The page numbers will appear on every page except those pages with Suppress codes.
Suppose you’ve made some changes to the styles or swatches in your chapter 5 document, and now you want to use those updated styles or swatches throughout your book. Click in the column to the left of chapter 5 to set chapter 5 as your book’s style source. Select all the other documents that you want to synchronize to chapter 5 by pressing Ctrl/Cmd and clicking the documents (they’ll turn blue when selected).

Look at the three choices under Options. The choices are Insert blank pages, Insert one text box on each page, and Duplicate all objects on page (you will have the option of inserting a page number inside the rectangle to the right of this option). If you want insert all blank pages, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert blank pages. If you want insert one text box on each page, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert one text box on each page. If you want duplicate all objects on a certain page, then click inside the small circle in front of Duplicate all objects on page. You will then need to type a number of the page you want to duplicate inside the rectangle to the right of Duplicate all objects on page.


Well, no, I didn’t say that I’ve been trying to use chapter numbers. What I’ve been saying is that I’m trying to insert new SECTION numbers. Because according to the official site, InDesign only allows a single chapter per document. For this reason, InDesign offers the workaround of placing and renewing the section marker in multiple locations, even if the word before it is “Chapter”.
Next double-click your document for Chapter 1 in the Book file to open it. In your Chapter 1 document, you’ll manually start the page numbering at page 1, and switch from lowercase roman numerals to arabic numerals. So go to the Pages panel, click on the thumbnail image of the first page of the document to highlight it, then click Numbering & Section Options in the Pages fly-out menu. Select Start Page Numbering at, and type 1 in the adjoining box. Then select arabic numerals in the Page Numbering Style drop-down menu, as shown below. Click OK, and all the pages in the document will now be numbered with arabic numerals starting with number 1.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
Tip: A “page x of y” page number tells you the number of the current page (x) and the total number of pages in the document (y). To create a “page x of y” page number, select Page 1 of 1 in the Page Numbering Format list box. (Note that if you have more than one page in your document when you insert or change the page numbers, the “Page 1 of 1” option may appear in the dialog box as “Page 1 of 2,” “Page 2 of 5,” and so on, depending on the current page and the total number of pages.).
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.

We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
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