A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.
The standard method for displaying a page number in InDesign is to insert an Automatic Page Number Marker into a text frame (Text menu: Insert Special Character: Marker: Current Page Number). This is typically done on your master page(s) so that the page number will appear on every page using that master. If you wish to hide the page number on pages in your document, just use a different master that does not include the marker (or use the “None” master if you do not wish to display any master page items).
Check the Restart Numbering After option, if you want sublevel numbers to start at 1. In most cases, you'll want to set the After option to the previous heading, as shown in Figure F. Doing so forces Word to start renumbering Heading 2 paragraphs after each new Heading 1 paragraph. In other words, when Heading 1 updates to 2, the sublevel number will start over at 1, generating 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and so on.
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.
In Japanese, Chinese, or Korean versions, by default, Arabic numerals are used for page numbers. However, if you use the Numbering & Section Options command, you can specify the style of numbering, such as Roman numerals, Arabic numerals, Kanji, and so on. The Style option allows you to select the number of digits in the page number, for example, 001 or 0001. Each part of the document that uses a different numbering style is called a section. For more information on sections, see Define section numbering.
You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.

Drag the number, which Publisher defaults to “1,” into place on the ticket. To change the sequence, such as to start with “100” instead of “1,” click the “Page Number” button again and choose “Format Page Numbers.” Click the “Start this section with” radio button and type the new number into the field. Click the “OK” button to have Publisher update the ticket number.
When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.
Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.
It's also possible to consecutively number list items in InDesign. Create a text frame for your list and click the numbered list button to insert a list. Type your list items, pressing your "Enter" key between items. InDesign consecutively numbers the list automatically; you can change the number it begins with and the style of the numerals. Press your "Alt" key (Windows) or "Option" key (Mac OS) while clicking on the numbered list button to open a dialog where you can modify those options.
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.
In this video we're going to look at starting your page numbering, not from 1, you can see, we started A, B, C, D, and 1 actually starts on page 5. That means we can have a Contents page, and a Cover that don't get included in the page number. That's going to help us with a couple of things, like our Contents page. Otherwise our first bit of text is going to start on page 5. That's not true, it's on 1. It's kind of true. Anyway, let's go and look at setting out our page numbers.
Generating an automatic table of contents is explained in Book Design Made Simple on pages 240–244, and the process is just slightly different when you’re using the Book feature. Your table of contents will be included in your front matter document, so open that document and click Layout>Table of Contents to open your Table of Contents dialog box (see our example below). Note that at the bottom left of the dialog box, the box called Include Book Documents is checked. That is the only difference when working in a Book file!
You can't use Word's Numbering feature to generate a multilevel numbering system, even if you use built-in heading styles. Figure A shows a document with two styled heading levels: Heading 1 and Heading 2. You can apply the Numbering option (in the Paragraph group) and Word will number the headings consequently, but the feature ignores different levels; if you expected 1, 1.1, 2, 2.1, and 2.2, you might be surprised. If you select the entire document first, Numbering not only ignores the different levels, but it also numbers the paragraphs!
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:

My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.

There may be instances in your Adobe InDesign documents that you want to change the start page, by default the numbering starts at page one on the first page of your document but if you right click on for example page 2 you can select ‘Numbering and section options’ then you can click the button ‘Start page numbering at’ then type ‘2’ in to the box. this will snow start a new section on page two which will make page 2’s page number actually page 1. You can start new page numbering sections anywhere in your Adobe InDesign document. 


Actually the Numbering & Section Options are not available in the Master page setup which is where the page numbering was set (so that I can have the chapter number appear on all odd-numbered pages). The Numbering & Section Options are, however, available on the normal pages. So that’s where I’ve set the automatic numbering, but of course nothing changes — the book is chapter 1 throughout. As for the setting in the “book panel”, this is something I can’t find. I don’t appear to have a “book panel”. I do have pages panel that seems to fit the description, but there is no add-document setting.
The steps in this article are going to show you how to add page numbers to the pages of your Publisher document. The page number will appear on every page of your document, at the location that you choose. Note that page numbers will also be included on any new pages that you add after inserting the page numbers, and they will update automatically if you delete any of the existing pages from the document.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:

The steps in this article are going to show you how to add page numbers to the pages of your Publisher document. The page number will appear on every page of your document, at the location that you choose. Note that page numbers will also be included on any new pages that you add after inserting the page numbers, and they will update automatically if you delete any of the existing pages from the document.
     One of the most profitable products a small print shop can produce is Raffle Tickets. But the trouble is most small to medium sized print shops either don't have a numbering unit or it is not setup to number multiple documents on a single sheet of paper. Most print shops do however have a laserjet or multi purpose printer. Combine that with some graphic software like Publisher and and easy to use numbering software program and you can capture the raffle ticket business and not let it slip away from you.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
The process of setting up chapter and volume numbers is essentially the same as setting up page numbers. You can use these numbering elements as a way to keep track of any number of items. Yes, they are labeled “chapters” and “volumes,” but if you ignore the labels, you’ll see that you can keep track of any “section” in a document. In fact, if you count page numbers, chapter numbers, volume numbers, and secondary page numbers, you’ll see that you have four different numbering methods at your disposal.
Thanks for asking, but if you haven't done the Google search I suggested in post 1 of this thread and practiced with any of the tutorials at the linked resources there, or those recommended in posts 2 and 6, please do. Perhaps someone on the list will do the work you're requesting. As a trainer I feel my best value is to offer paths to solutions so folks can learn to use the tools. Some tools require more practice, but those are the ones that give the most pleasure of discovery at the "Aha!" moment that comes when one "gets it."
There may be instances in your Adobe InDesign documents that you want to change the start page, by default the numbering starts at page one on the first page of your document but if you right click on for example page 2 you can select ‘Numbering and section options’ then you can click the button ‘Start page numbering at’ then type ‘2’ in to the box. this will snow start a new section on page two which will make page 2’s page number actually page 1. You can start new page numbering sections anywhere in your Adobe InDesign document. 
Gus: I think chapter numbers only work when you have multiple documents in a book panel. You need to use File > New > Book to create a book panel. I strongly urge you to read up about how books and long documents work before you go any farther. I have a number of movies at lynda.com on this subject. If you don’t have a subscription, you can watch 7 days for free with this link: http://www.lynda.com/trial/indesignsecrets

A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages. document numbering in indesign
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