Choose the predefined scheme that's most similar to what you want. For instance, if you want sublevels indented, choose the indented form; similarly, if you don't want sublevels indented, choose the flush left form, as shown in Figure C. Try to make the best choice right now because changing your mind later will present so many problems that starting over will be easier.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
You can also insert a page number inside existing artistic or paragraph text. If the text is located on a local layer, the page number is inserted on the current page only. If the text is located on a master layer, the page number becomes part of the master layer and appears on all pages where the master layer is visible. For more information about artistic and paragraph text, see Adding and manipulating text.
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.

To save the list style to a template so you can use it with other documents, select the list in the document. Access the Multilevel List dropdown and choose Define New List Style. Enter a descriptive new and select the New documents based on this template (at the bottom). Once you click OK, the multilevel list style will be available in all new documents.


Big project due tomorrow, and upon importing pages from another document, the new pages didn't follow the page numbering I had set. When I imported them at the back of the document, the first page started at 1 and went consecutively in order. This is not right, and I know it has something to do with the sections, however, I CANNOT for the life of me figure out how to just erase the section settings completely, or to revert everything back to having only 1 section (so there can be a consecutive page count throughout the entire document). This has also messed up my A-master page numbering, as this has reset to 1 as well, and even reapplying the A-master doesn't shuffle the page numbering into the actual page that it is (It's supposed to be page 70, but kicks back all the way to 1.)


Mike Rankin is the editor in chief of InDesignSecrets.com, InDesign Magazine, and CreativePro.com. Since 1995, Mike has enjoyed working in nearly every aspect of publishing production, including design, project management, layout, illustration, and prepress. He is a regular speaker at conferences like PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference and the InDesign Conference.
Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. A Current Page Number marker must be set on pages in order to use this feature. The Current Page Number is a special character inserted in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended) where the page number will appear, by selecting Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number.

To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog. document numbering in coreldraw
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