Look at the three choices under Options. The choices are Insert blank pages, Insert one text box on each page, and Duplicate all objects on page (you will have the option of inserting a page number inside the rectangle to the right of this option). If you want insert all blank pages, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert blank pages. If you want insert one text box on each page, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert one text box on each page. If you want duplicate all objects on a certain page, then click inside the small circle in front of Duplicate all objects on page. You will then need to type a number of the page you want to duplicate inside the rectangle to the right of Duplicate all objects on page.
Almost everything I learned about Word's numbering I learned from the Word newsgroups (especially the Microsoft Word Numbering newsgroup) and from the MS Word MVP FAQ site. The contributions of John McGhie (especially his article about Word's Numbering Explained on the MS Word MVP FAQ site) and Dave Rado are significant. The current page represents a mere summary and application of some of that work.

InDesign is a popular publishing software application released by Adobe. It is often used by graphic designers to publish books, magazines and brochures. Along with important elements like text, graphics and logos, page numbers are essential to these publications. It is possible to add the page numbers during or after the document's completion, if you know where to look. This article will tell you how to add page numbers in InDesign.


Generating an automatic table of contents is explained in Book Design Made Simple on pages 240–244, and the process is just slightly different when you’re using the Book feature. Your table of contents will be included in your front matter document, so open that document and click Layout>Table of Contents to open your Table of Contents dialog box (see our example below). Note that at the bottom left of the dialog box, the box called Include Book Documents is checked. That is the only difference when working in a Book file!

I have been having an issue with adding automatic page numbering to my multipage document. After adding the numbering it is showing up behind my background and objects on the page. If the page is blank, the numbering works just fine. But if I have other images or objects on the page, it lingers behind them. No matter what I do, it will not move to front of the page/objects/images. If I try and group the numbering and the objects on the page to combine them on the same layer, the numbering disappears from all remaining pages but the one I am currently on. Any help would be appreciated.

The standard method for displaying a page number in InDesign is to insert an Automatic Page Number Marker into a text frame (Text menu: Insert Special Character: Marker: Current Page Number). This is typically done on your master page(s) so that the page number will appear on every page using that master. If you wish to hide the page number on pages in your document, just use a different master that does not include the marker (or use the “None” master if you do not wish to display any master page items).

Mike Rankin is the editor in chief of InDesignSecrets.com, InDesign Magazine, and CreativePro.com. Since 1995, Mike has enjoyed working in nearly every aspect of publishing production, including design, project management, layout, illustration, and prepress. He is a regular speaker at conferences like PePcon: The Print + ePublishing Conference and the InDesign Conference.

InDesign is a popular publishing software application released by Adobe. It is often used by graphic designers to publish books, magazines and brochures. Along with important elements like text, graphics and logos, page numbers are essential to these publications. It is possible to add the page numbers during or after the document's completion, if you know where to look. This article will tell you how to add page numbers in InDesign.
I answer readers' questions when I can, but there's no guarantee. Don't send files unless requested; initial requests for help that arrive with attached files will be deleted unread. You can send screenshots of your data to help clarify your question. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise when helping readers, nor do I ask for a fee from readers I help. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.

If you use Versions (File + Versions) to store multiple versions of a document within a single file, then it will only be a matter of time before your document corrupts and you lose all your work. Avoid this feature like the plague - and like Fast Save and Master Documents, which are similarly broken – unless the document is of no importance to you. Taking backups won't necessarily help, because the corruption may creep up on you gradually, and by the time you realise you have a corruption you may have to go back to a very old file to get a clean document.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
If the list you want is as simple as "1", "2", "3", you'll appreciate how easy it is to apply this type of numbering in legal documents. Simple numbered lists are different in Word 2000 than they were in Word 97. In Word 2000, the default for even the most basic list is multi-level. For example, if you number an item and press Enter and then press the TAB key, Word automatically formats this number as the second level in an outline numbered list format. Single and multi-level numbering are explained later in this chapter.
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