Im doing a 8 1/2 x 14 sheet with a table on it of 17 rows, I want to number the table's left column and I really don't want to create multiple pages and manually enter the number. I know Corel has a print merge, but all the column number on each page is the same.....I want 1 - 17 on one page, 18-34 on the next and so on up to 3,400....... aprox.. 200 pages.
If you go into Print Preview, the field will automatically update in the Headers or Footers. Unfortunately, if you also have the field in the main document, (for example, in the coversheet), going into Print Preview won't update it – but printing will, provided that you have Update Fields ticked under Tools + Options + Print. You can also update the field by selecting it and pressing F9. Or you can press Ctrl+A followed by F9 to update all the fields in the main document in one go.
Note: If you are a developer, you would do much better to use a Document Variable rather than a Document Property (so that the user can't update the version without using your macros); and to write a version control macro assigned to an “Update Version” button to take care of updating the document variable, the “Last  Updated Date”, the revision history and the document's filename (and the filepath, if you have an archive strategy for old versions), as well as taking care of transitions between draft and live status. However, that is outside the scope of this article.
Notice that the Font option (when you applied italics) changes only the number, not the heading text. To update the heading text, modify the heading style as you normally would. Word assumes you want all Heading 1 and Heading 2 styles included in the new numbering scheme. If you want to omit a heading level from the scheme, don't use a built-in heading style to format those headings.
A note about link exchanges. This site does not participate in link exchanges to build web presence. If you have a link that you think would be of use to people reading this page, please send it to the webmaster with the url of the page where you think it should appear and it will be considered. Your placing a link to this site will not affect the decision on whether to add your link, though.
If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.

In records containing punctuation, enclose data in a single occurrence of subfield ǂq in parentheses. Enclose data in multiple occurrences of subfield ǂq in one set of parentheses and separate individual occurrences of subfield ǂq with a space, semicolon, space. Omit any punctuation from the end of the field unless it ends with an ellipsis, hyphen, closing parenthesis, exclamation point, question mark, or period following an abbreviation.

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random. 

A request for numbering headings in a new document doesn't have to elicit terror—it only sounds ghoulish. If you're good with styles, you might consider a custom numbered list style, but that's too much work. Instead, use Word's built-in heading styles for a painless process. My best advice is to get the numbering scheme in place before you create the document. Trying to number headings in an existing document really can cause nightmares!
The process of setting up chapter and volume numbers is essentially the same as setting up page numbers. You can use these numbering elements as a way to keep track of any number of items. Yes, they are labeled “chapters” and “volumes,” but if you ignore the labels, you’ll see that you can keep track of any “section” in a document. In fact, if you count page numbers, chapter numbers, volume numbers, and secondary page numbers, you’ll see that you have four different numbering methods at your disposal.
Tip: A “page x of y” page number tells you the number of the current page (x) and the total number of pages in the document (y). To create a “page x of y” page number, select Page 1 of 1 in the Page Numbering Format list box. (Note that if you have more than one page in your document when you insert or change the page numbers, the “Page 1 of 1” option may appear in the dialog box as “Page 1 of 2,” “Page 2 of 5,” and so on, depending on the current page and the total number of pages.).
Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
×