A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.
- With InDesign Books you can set the numbering styles and values for pages, chapters, sections, and lists and have those numbers update automatically when the length or order of your documents changes, so let's check it out. The numbering options are found in the Book panel menu and there are Book Page Numbering Options and Document Numbering Options. Let's take a look at each of these. First we'll take a look at the document page numbering options and in order to choose this you have to have exactly one document selected in your book panel. If the document was closed it opens. In this dialog box you'll see all the settings that are in the Numbering and Section options dialog box that you can open from InDesign's layout menu or the pages panel. You can also just double-click on a page range to open this dialog box. Documents added to a book will number their pages and chapters sequentially with Arabic numerals unless you change those settings using either the numbering and section…

This simple technique makes quick work of a single-level numbered list and accommodates multiple lists within the same document. However, it doesn't work with multilevel lists. If you must work with an existing document, modify the heading style as shown above. Then, select each heading and apply the heading style that you modified by adding a numbering scheme. As I mentioned, this isn't possible if the existing document already employs the heading style. But if you face numbering headings in a document, you know you've got the request covered—and you won't lose a minute's composure. Just tell them, "Yes, I can do that."
This simple technique makes quick work of a single-level numbered list and accommodates multiple lists within the same document. However, it doesn't work with multilevel lists. If you must work with an existing document, modify the heading style as shown above. Then, select each heading and apply the heading style that you modified by adding a numbering scheme. As I mentioned, this isn't possible if the existing document already employs the heading style. But if you face numbering headings in a document, you know you've got the request covered—and you won't lose a minute's composure. Just tell them, "Yes, I can do that."
If you would like the page number placed in a different location, open the Position list box and choose another option. Notice how the preview pages are updated to show you how the page number will look on the printed page. Choose OK to insert the page number code. This code will be automatically updated with the correct page number, no matter how many pages you add or subtract from the document
If you would like the page number placed in a different location, open the Position list box and choose another option. Notice how the preview pages are updated to show you how the page number will look on the printed page. Choose OK to insert the page number code. This code will be automatically updated with the correct page number, no matter how many pages you add or subtract from the document
InDesign’s Book feature can be handy! Let’s say you’re working on a book with lots of images and/or chapters. And the file sizes are enormous. In fact, they are so big that you thought it would be smart to divide the book into separate documents for parts or chapters. That’s exactly what we did with Book Design Made Simple. It was more convenient for us to swap smaller sections back and forth than to send the entire book each time. All the parts or chapters were linked together at the end using InDesign’s Book feature. So this blog post explains how to create a Book file, or as we call it, “book” a book.
Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages. document numbering in indesign
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