Microsoft Office Publisher is a software that can be used as a tool to design brochures, flyers, newsletters, and business cards; create word processing documents, marketing tools and websites; and publish websites to the web. Publisher has many templates and wizards that help users through the process of creating documents and tailoring documents to the needs of the user. You can make a multiple page document in Publisher by either duplicating pages, adding blank pages, or adding pages with text boxes on each page. Adding pages with text boxes on each page will save you a lot of time from adding the text box to each page manually. Utilizing the blank pages option is usually for creating pages that will have text pasted from the clipboard.

My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.


Starting an auto-numbered paragraph is deceptively simple. See those buttons on the top row of the Paragraph section of the Home tab? The left-most one is for bullets; the next two to its right are for numbering and multi-level numbering, respectively. Simply click the button to toggle the feature on, or click on the drop-down arrow on each button to select a specific style. If you don’t like any of the delivered choices, you can click Define New to set your own.
Look at the three choices under Options. The choices are Insert blank pages, Insert one text box on each page, and Duplicate all objects on page (you will have the option of inserting a page number inside the rectangle to the right of this option). If you want insert all blank pages, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert blank pages. If you want insert one text box on each page, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert one text box on each page. If you want duplicate all objects on a certain page, then click inside the small circle in front of Duplicate all objects on page. You will then need to type a number of the page you want to duplicate inside the rectangle to the right of Duplicate all objects on page.
Let’s say you want to use roman numerals for the introductory pages, arabic numbers for the main body and lowercase letters for the closing pages. Each of these formats can be selected in the Page Numbering Format dialog box. First, position the insertion point where you want to start using a different page number format. Choose Format > Page > Numbering. In the Page Numbering Format list box, select a format, and then choose OK to insert the page number.
To package your book, first select all the documents in your Book file by clicking the first document, pressing Shift, and clicking the last document. Now click the fly-out menu at the top of the Book panel, and choose Package Book for Print. InDesign will take a moment to gather all the info it needs, then you’ll see a Package dialog box (click Package after resolving any warnings), a Printing Instructions dialog box (click Continue), and finally the Package Publication dialog box (see below), where you’ll choose a file name and place to save your packaged folder, and then click Package.
You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.
If PickleRick's answer doesn't work for you, then you probably have some sort of setting activated in your document which tells InDesign to create a new section when you use a different master page. I don't want to complicate things unnecessarily, so I am not posting instructions about that here, but let us know if you try implementing this solution and it doesn't seem to work and we can help you continue to problem solve (if you do so, it would be really helpful for us to see a screenshot of your pages panel). – magerber Aug 8 '17 at 17:42
Hello Betsy, I have never heard of any kind of limit on the number of pages in a book. However, once a book gets too big it’s harder to find a good binding to hold it together, and it’s harder to pick the book up. If you’re thinking of anything longer than maybe 3000 pages, you should talk with a printer about proper binding, good thin paper, etc. to make it usable. And consider dividing it all into separate volumes.

Let’s say you want to use roman numerals for the introductory pages, arabic numbers for the main body and lowercase letters for the closing pages. Each of these formats can be selected in the Page Numbering Format dialog box. First, position the insertion point where you want to start using a different page number format. Choose Format > Page > Numbering. In the Page Numbering Format list box, select a format, and then choose OK to insert the page number.
To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog. document numbering in coreldraw
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