Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers

A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
Each time you work on a document in your Book file, it’s best to open your Book file first, then double-click the document to open it within the Book file. That way, the Book file remains up to date. If you work on a document outside of the Book file, the Book file will show an error symbol next to that document. If that happens, just double-click the document in the Book file to open it and re-save it to get rid of the error. And after you’ve saved your documents, remember to save your Book file too.
If you go into Print Preview, the field will automatically update in the Headers or Footers. Unfortunately, if you also have the field in the main document, (for example, in the coversheet), going into Print Preview won't update it – but printing will, provided that you have Update Fields ticked under Tools + Options + Print. You can also update the field by selecting it and pressing F9. Or you can press Ctrl+A followed by F9 to update all the fields in the main document in one go.
If you would like the page number placed in a different location, open the Position list box and choose another option. Notice how the preview pages are updated to show you how the page number will look on the printed page. Choose OK to insert the page number code. This code will be automatically updated with the correct page number, no matter how many pages you add or subtract from the document
Generating an automatic table of contents is explained in Book Design Made Simple on pages 240–244, and the process is just slightly different when you’re using the Book feature. Your table of contents will be included in your front matter document, so open that document and click Layout>Table of Contents to open your Table of Contents dialog box (see our example below). Note that at the bottom left of the dialog box, the box called Include Book Documents is checked. That is the only difference when working in a Book file!
I want to point out that if this document is a fixed set of standards but will be amended in later editions, then autonumbers will increment, which is a bad idea. In legal documents, numbers are usually static, and deletions are struck-through, not deleted, to preserve the original numbering, so that older and newer editions can be compared number-by-number. Inserted and appended content would need to be manually numbered. You may want to create the first edition with autonumbering, then convert the numbered list numbers to text, to avoid unwanted renumbering in future editions.
Each time you work on a document in your Book file, it’s best to open your Book file first, then double-click the document to open it within the Book file. That way, the Book file remains up to date. If you work on a document outside of the Book file, the Book file will show an error symbol next to that document. If that happens, just double-click the document in the Book file to open it and re-save it to get rid of the error. And after you’ve saved your documents, remember to save your Book file too.
Select documents in your Book file by pressing Ctrl/Cmd and clicking the documents, then click the fly-out menu at the top of the Book panel. If you’ve selected all the documents in your Book file, you’ll see Export Book to PDF in the fly-out menu, and if you’ve only selected some of the documents, you’ll see Export Selected Documents to PDF instead. Click the option you see, and InDesign will present the same Export dialog box you normally get when exporting to PDF in InDesign. Choose your file name and options, click Export, and voila!
Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.
An awesome new feature to has been introduced to Microsoft Publisher 2010 is the ability to use Data Sources to create "Catalogue Pages". This is like a Mail Merge for design documents. Now, I would have to agree that Publisher isn't the best graphic design program in the market. But it's certainly adequate for simple ticket designs — for example, for a school social. Let's say we want each ticket to have a unique number and an inspiration quote. This is all possible through Publisher and a data source, e.g. an Excel Spreadsheet.
A best practice that we recommend to our clients is to create a base/folio master –with styled and positioned footers and current page number special characters– on which all other masters are based. This allows a footer that may contain date or issue information to be updated once and the changes are reflected in all of the master pages. If your masters only have current page number special characters then you can just add them to each master and the page numbers will be reflected when each master is applied to your document pages.
Big project due tomorrow, and upon importing pages from another document, the new pages didn't follow the page numbering I had set. When I imported them at the back of the document, the first page started at 1 and went consecutively in order. This is not right, and I know it has something to do with the sections, however, I CANNOT for the life of me figure out how to just erase the section settings completely, or to revert everything back to having only 1 section (so there can be a consecutive page count throughout the entire document). This has also messed up my A-master page numbering, as this has reset to 1 as well, and even reapplying the A-master doesn't shuffle the page numbering into the actual page that it is (It's supposed to be page 70, but kicks back all the way to 1.)
Page numbering is set within each document (see Book Design Made Simple, page 245). To set your page numbering to automatic, start by opening the document containing your front matter. Your front matter will have a separate page numbering system from the rest of your book, using lowercase roman numerals. Go to the Pages panel, click on the thumbnail image of the first page to highlight it, then click Numbering & Section Options in the Pages fly-out menu. Select Automatic Page Numbering at the top, and lowercase roman numerals in the Page Numbering Style drop-down menu, as shown below. Click OK, and all the pages in the document will now be numbered with lowercase roman numerals starting with number i.
In records containing punctuation, enclose data in a single occurrence of subfield ǂq in parentheses. Enclose data in multiple occurrences of subfield ǂq in one set of parentheses and separate individual occurrences of subfield ǂq with a space, semicolon, space. Omit any punctuation from the end of the field unless it ends with an ellipsis, hyphen, closing parenthesis, exclamation point, question mark, or period following an abbreviation.

Law firms use numbered lists daily to prepare contracts, pleadings, letters and memos. Word makes activating and customizing numbering fairly straightforward. You can create simple numbered lists, such as A, B, C and 1, 2, 3. You can also customize these lists to setup specific numbering styles for your firm and practice group. Multilevel lists such as I, A, 1 are handled through Word's Outline Numbering feature, which is explained later in this chapter. Many firms rely on outline numbered lists to draw up contracts and pleadings. Like numbered lists, outline numbered lists can be customized.
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