The standard method for displaying a page number in InDesign is to insert an Automatic Page Number Marker into a text frame (Text menu: Insert Special Character: Marker: Current Page Number). This is typically done on your master page(s) so that the page number will appear on every page using that master. If you wish to hide the page number on pages in your document, just use a different master that does not include the marker (or use the “None” master if you do not wish to display any master page items).
Do not let me lead you into a headache under false pretences: this FAQ is not going to tell you how to fix a document that contains broken numbering. It simply explains how the numbering works: this is valuable information if you work with Word a lot, and by understanding it, you can often work out how to fix a document. However, this FAQ is not going to tell you how.  (For a discussion of methods, see: List Restart Methods).
The page number feature in WordPerfect® is very comprehensive. You can start by inserting a basic page number and progress to creating customized page numbers that include chapter and volume numbers. You can also create a custom page number with a combination of these numbers. For example, you might create a page number that shows the current page and the chapter number, or the current page and the total number of pages (also called “page x of y”).
Tip: Page numbers are printed on the top or bottom line in the text area of the page, not in the margin space. WordPerfect inserts a blank line to separate the page number from the rest of the document text. This reduces the amount of text that would normally fit on the page by two lines. If you decrease your top or bottom margin (depending on where you put the page numbers) to approximately 2/3 inch, you can regain the lost space, and the page numbers will appear to print in the margin space.
In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
Select the text frame with the Selection Tool (V, Escape) and go to Edit > Copy and Edit > Paste. Manoeuvre this second text frame onto the left-hand page in a mirrored position. InDesign will provide pop-up guidelines once the text frame lines up exactly with the frame on the right-hand page. Once your happy with the positioning, select the Type Tool (T) and adjust the orientation of the text to Align Left from the Character Formatting Controls panel, as before.
I want to point out that if this document is a fixed set of standards but will be amended in later editions, then autonumbers will increment, which is a bad idea. In legal documents, numbers are usually static, and deletions are struck-through, not deleted, to preserve the original numbering, so that older and newer editions can be compared number-by-number. Inserted and appended content would need to be manually numbered. You may want to create the first edition with autonumbering, then convert the numbered list numbers to text, to avoid unwanted renumbering in future editions.
We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog. document numbering in coreldraw
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