The first step is to decide if you want to include a label with the number. For example, you might want the word “Chapter” to appear before the actual chapter number. If you want to include a label, type it in the Custom Page Numbering Format text box. Next, select a numbering style from one of the list boxes, and click the Insert in Format button to insert the numbering code in the Custom Page Numbering Format text box.
Choose the predefined scheme that's most similar to what you want. For instance, if you want sublevels indented, choose the indented form; similarly, if you don't want sublevels indented, choose the flush left form, as shown in Figure C. Try to make the best choice right now because changing your mind later will present so many problems that starting over will be easier.
Let’s say you want to use roman numerals for the introductory pages, arabic numbers for the main body and lowercase letters for the closing pages. Each of these formats can be selected in the Page Numbering Format dialog box. First, position the insertion point where you want to start using a different page number format. Choose Format > Page > Numbering. In the Page Numbering Format list box, select a format, and then choose OK to insert the page number.
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You’ll be gathering several InDesign documents into one Book file to create a book. If you’re just getting started on your chapters, it’s best to design one of your more complex chapters first, then use that chapter as a template for all the remaining ones (i.e., “Save As” Chapter 1, delete all the original chapter’s text, place the Chapter 1 text, and thereby leave the trim size, margins, and styles intact and consistent among all chapters).
To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog.
The steps in this article are going to show you how to add page numbers to the pages of your Publisher document. The page number will appear on every page of your document, at the location that you choose. Note that page numbers will also be included on any new pages that you add after inserting the page numbers, and they will update automatically if you delete any of the existing pages from the document.
Let’s say you want to use roman numerals for the introductory pages, arabic numbers for the main body and lowercase letters for the closing pages. Each of these formats can be selected in the Page Numbering Format dialog box. First, position the insertion point where you want to start using a different page number format. Choose Format > Page > Numbering. In the Page Numbering Format list box, select a format, and then choose OK to insert the page number.

Some drawbacks to this feature are that you lose a little control when you are typing. Word formats for you and some users do not like this. Also, on certain items, you will get a number when you do not expect or need one. For example, you have an attorney whose name begins with an initial (A. George Smith). When you type the name and press ENTER, the first initial "A." converts to an automatic number.
Big project due tomorrow, and upon importing pages from another document, the new pages didn't follow the page numbering I had set. When I imported them at the back of the document, the first page started at 1 and went consecutively in order. This is not right, and I know it has something to do with the sections, however, I CANNOT for the life of me figure out how to just erase the section settings completely, or to revert everything back to having only 1 section (so there can be a consecutive page count throughout the entire document). This has also messed up my A-master page numbering, as this has reset to 1 as well, and even reapplying the A-master doesn't shuffle the page numbering into the actual page that it is (It's supposed to be page 70, but kicks back all the way to 1.)
You will occasionally want to place an unnumbered paragraph in the middle of a sequence, but the moment you hit Enter, another paragraph number pops up. To fix this, toggle paragraph numbering off by pressing the paragraph numbering button you used for the previous paragraph. (If you use the button’s drop-down, choose None as the numbering scheme.) Unfortunately, the paragraph settings won’t revert to Normal here; it’ll usually have the paragraph indented 0.25. Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Q to strip paragraph settings out, then revise the formatting as you wish.
Creating Long Documents with InDesign shows designers how to plan, create, and output book-length documents using InDesign CC features and third-party plugins. Publishing veteran Mike Rankin focuses on long-document elements such as page and chapter numbering, tables of contents, cross-references, and indexes. The course also provides strategies and best practices for document construction, from creating master pages and applying consistent formatting with styles, to placing text and images and outputting to both print and interactive PDF.
Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers
When you're working on a document such as a magazine or a book with many pages in it, using the master page feature in Adobe InDesign CC 2015 to insert automatic page numbering simplifies working with the document. On a master page, you designate the position, font, and size of the page numbers and any additional text you want to accompany the numbers such as the magazine name, date or the word "Page." Then that information appears on every page of the document along with the correct page number. As you work, you can add and remove pages or rearrange entire sections, and the numbers remain accurate.
Well, no, I didn’t say that I’ve been trying to use chapter numbers. What I’ve been saying is that I’m trying to insert new SECTION numbers. Because according to the official site, InDesign only allows a single chapter per document. For this reason, InDesign offers the workaround of placing and renewing the section marker in multiple locations, even if the word before it is “Chapter”.
Look at the three choices under Options. The choices are Insert blank pages, Insert one text box on each page, and Duplicate all objects on page (you will have the option of inserting a page number inside the rectangle to the right of this option). If you want insert all blank pages, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert blank pages. If you want insert one text box on each page, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert one text box on each page. If you want duplicate all objects on a certain page, then click inside the small circle in front of Duplicate all objects on page. You will then need to type a number of the page you want to duplicate inside the rectangle to the right of Duplicate all objects on page.
If you start to type in what appears to be a numbered list, Word formats your manually typed "numbers" to an automatic numbered list. The main benefit of this option is that you do not need to click any button to start numbering and you can choose your numbering style as well. For example, if you type "(a) some text" and press Enter, it starts numbering using the "(a)" format.
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