While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.
If you want numbered headings to be underlined, but do not want a line under the number, it can be difficult if you don't know how it works. This is because by default, the format of the number follows the format of the text that follows it. For example, let's say you want to underline a paragraph in a Heading 2 style. Chances are it will look like this:
If you go into Print Preview, the field will automatically update in the Headers or Footers. Unfortunately, if you also have the field in the main document, (for example, in the coversheet), going into Print Preview won't update it – but printing will, provided that you have Update Fields ticked under Tools + Options + Print. You can also update the field by selecting it and pressing F9. Or you can press Ctrl+A followed by F9 to update all the fields in the main document in one go.
Creating Long Documents with InDesign shows designers how to plan, create, and output book-length documents using InDesign CC features and third-party plugins. Publishing veteran Mike Rankin focuses on long-document elements such as page and chapter numbering, tables of contents, cross-references, and indexes. The course also provides strategies and best practices for document construction, from creating master pages and applying consistent formatting with styles, to placing text and images and outputting to both print and interactive PDF.
@MohanRajuM Repeating the same thing again isn't going to help. “Set page number for my catalogue” does not make sense in English; I don't understand what it's supposed to mean exactly. We don't normally talk about ‘setting’ a page number. Please explain in detail what it is you want to do. Are you talking about adding page numbers to every page in the document? Or are you talking about defining how the page number should be presented? Or something else entirely? – Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 8 '17 at 21:33
Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
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