In the Adobe InDesign document I’m working on here we actually have two master pages, an ‘A’ master and a ‘B’ master so I’m going to select both the left and right hand page frames with the special character in on my ‘A’ master and go to Edit>Copy. I’m then going to double click on my ‘B’ master page and go to Edit>Paste in place. this will then copy the special character and position it in exactly the same place as it appears on my ‘A’ master.
You’ll see in the Book file shown below that the left column contains a symbol in one of the rows called Indicates the Style Source. It means that the document in that row contains the styles that govern all the documents in the Book file if you choose to synchronize the styles. Synchronizing styles using the Book feature will synchronize your paragraph styles, character styles, object styles, and color swatches.
Over the last few months, we've reviewed Word's numbered list features. Specifically, How to control spacing and alignment in a numbered list in Microsoft Word shows how to control spacing and alignment and How to number headings in a Word 2016 document shows a simple way to number headings. In this article, we'll continue by reviewing Word's Multilevel List feature. Fortunately, it's easier to implement and modify than you might think.
If PickleRick's answer doesn't work for you, then you probably have some sort of setting activated in your document which tells InDesign to create a new section when you use a different master page. I don't want to complicate things unnecessarily, so I am not posting instructions about that here, but let us know if you try implementing this solution and it doesn't seem to work and we can help you continue to problem solve (if you do so, it would be really helpful for us to see a screenshot of your pages panel). – magerber Aug 8 '17 at 17:42
The next step is to create the simple Excel workbook that contains the ticket numbers. Open a blank Excel sheet. Using Figure B as a guide, create the ticket numbering sheet and save it, making sure to note the new workbook's name and location. As we discussed earlier, the Excel workbook stores the ticket numbers. In this example, we'll create 11 tickets numbered 100 through 110. You'll need to update the ticket values for each merge.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
You may wonder whether typing 1, 2, and 3 would be easier than using the ListNum field. Although doing that may be easier initially, the value of using the ListNum field becomes apparent when you cut and paste. When a paragraph contains multiple numbered items that you move or delete, Word automatically updates the ListNum fields. Using ListNum fields assures you of accurate numbering within a paragraph throughout the document.
When you are ready to restart numbering, you can use the technique above, or you can place your cursor inside a numbered paragraph above, click the Format Painter (the paintbrush icon on the Home tab under Clipboard), then click on the line where you want to restart numbering. Using Format Painter this way solves several paragraph numbering problems (the number sequence, indents, and inter-paragraph spacing) simultaneously.
Running captions number figures, tables, and other items consecutively in a document. For example, the first figure caption starts with the words “Figure 1,” the second with “Figure 2,” and so on. To make sure that figures, tables, or similar items are numbered consecutively, define a list for the item, and then create a paragraph style that includes the list definition. You can also add descriptive words such as “Figure” or “Table” to the numbering scheme of the paragraph style.

    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.
Next double-click your document for Chapter 1 in the Book file to open it. In your Chapter 1 document, you’ll manually start the page numbering at page 1, and switch from lowercase roman numerals to arabic numerals. So go to the Pages panel, click on the thumbnail image of the first page of the document to highlight it, then click Numbering & Section Options in the Pages fly-out menu. Select Start Page Numbering at, and type 1 in the adjoining box. Then select arabic numerals in the Page Numbering Style drop-down menu, as shown below. Click OK, and all the pages in the document will now be numbered with arabic numerals starting with number 1.
You can use Microsoft Word to create complex documents. Books and other large documents occasionally require different page number formats in different sections of one document. For example, you can number the index pages with Roman numerals (for example, "i.", "ii.", "iii.") and the main document with Arabic numerals (for example, "1", "2", "3"). This article describes how to set up different page numbering formats.

Because this document has facing pages, we want to insert page numbers on both the left and right pages. For now, navigate to the bottom-right corner of the right-hand page by zooming in (Ctrl + [Windows] or Cmd + [Mac]). Select the Type Tool (T) from the Tools Panel (Window > Tools) and drag to create a small text frame, resting the top of the frame against the margin.

Let's say you just created a paragraph in Heading 1 style. Now, you press Enter to go on to create the next paragraph. What style will that paragraph be in? You can modify a style to stipulate the style Word uses for the following paragraph. So you could set it up so that, when you're entering text, a Heading 1 will be followed by a Heading 2. And, you could set it up so that a paragraph in Heading 2 will be followed by a paragraph in style Body Text.
Well, no, I didn’t say that I’ve been trying to use chapter numbers. What I’ve been saying is that I’m trying to insert new SECTION numbers. Because according to the official site, InDesign only allows a single chapter per document. For this reason, InDesign offers the workaround of placing and renewing the section marker in multiple locations, even if the word before it is “Chapter”.
You will occasionally want to place an unnumbered paragraph in the middle of a sequence, but the moment you hit Enter, another paragraph number pops up. To fix this, toggle paragraph numbering off by pressing the paragraph numbering button you used for the previous paragraph. (If you use the button’s drop-down, choose None as the numbering scheme.) Unfortunately, the paragraph settings won’t revert to Normal here; it’ll usually have the paragraph indented 0.25. Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Q to strip paragraph settings out, then revise the formatting as you wish.

So I spent some time trying to figure it out, playing with Normal.dotm and the various styles (List paragraph, List Number, List Bullet etc etc). And finally, when I've got Normal.dotm open (i.e. I'm editing that template file), I get my result: I apply a standard numbered list, and it comes up flush left (i.e. not indented) and hanging at 1.0cm (cos I don't use inches...) and with a tab stop applied at 1.0cm as well - funky stuff!
If you’ve already created separate InDesign files for your chapters, you can combine them using the Book feature just fine as long as they all have the same trim size. Books look better when margins and styles are consistent throughout, but it’s not a requirement. The Book feature will allow you to synchronize styles throughout all your booked documents, but again, it’s not a requirement, and it doesn’t happen automatically.
Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering. I strongly recommend that you read both of these before doing anything with the contents of this chapter.
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