Big project due tomorrow, and upon importing pages from another document, the new pages didn't follow the page numbering I had set. When I imported them at the back of the document, the first page started at 1 and went consecutively in order. This is not right, and I know it has something to do with the sections, however, I CANNOT for the life of me figure out how to just erase the section settings completely, or to revert everything back to having only 1 section (so there can be a consecutive page count throughout the entire document). This has also messed up my A-master page numbering, as this has reset to 1 as well, and even reapplying the A-master doesn't shuffle the page numbering into the actual page that it is (It's supposed to be page 70, but kicks back all the way to 1.)
I have a word document with a table of 6 exact cells on a full page table. In those cell areas I have been printing tickets with a list and a mail merge and updating labels. I call to an excel list of 1-2000 and then I generate all the pages through the Finish and Merge option. This all works perfect. I get 2000 individually numbered tickets to print...however...I then have six tickets printed on a page of paper with ticket numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 then the next page has 7,8,9,10,11,12. This is fine but I then have to cut and stack these tickets in groups of six and at that point none of the numbering is sequential. The tickets are basically random.
Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
The standard method for displaying a page number in InDesign is to insert an Automatic Page Number Marker into a text frame (Text menu: Insert Special Character: Marker: Current Page Number). This is typically done on your master page(s) so that the page number will appear on every page using that master. If you wish to hide the page number on pages in your document, just use a different master that does not include the marker (or use the “None” master if you do not wish to display any master page items).
The process of setting up chapter and volume numbers is essentially the same as setting up page numbers. You can use these numbering elements as a way to keep track of any number of items. Yes, they are labeled “chapters” and “volumes,” but if you ignore the labels, you’ll see that you can keep track of any “section” in a document. In fact, if you count page numbers, chapter numbers, volume numbers, and secondary page numbers, you’ll see that you have four different numbering methods at your disposal.
If you would like the page number placed in a different location, open the Position list box and choose another option. Notice how the preview pages are updated to show you how the page number will look on the printed page. Choose OK to insert the page number code. This code will be automatically updated with the correct page number, no matter how many pages you add or subtract from the document
You can't use Word's Numbering feature to generate a multilevel numbering system, even if you use built-in heading styles. Figure A shows a document with two styled heading levels: Heading 1 and Heading 2. You can apply the Numbering option (in the Paragraph group) and Word will number the headings consequently, but the feature ignores different levels; if you expected 1, 1.1, 2, 2.1, and 2.2, you might be surprised. If you select the entire document first, Numbering not only ignores the different levels, but it also numbers the paragraphs!
I want to point out that if this document is a fixed set of standards but will be amended in later editions, then autonumbers will increment, which is a bad idea. In legal documents, numbers are usually static, and deletions are struck-through, not deleted, to preserve the original numbering, so that older and newer editions can be compared number-by-number. Inserted and appended content would need to be manually numbered. You may want to create the first edition with autonumbering, then convert the numbered list numbers to text, to avoid unwanted renumbering in future editions.
The easiest way to implement a numbering scheme for headings is to add one to a heading style. To illustrate, we'll modify Heading 1 by adding a numbering scheme. First, right-click Heading 1 in the Styles gallery (in the Styles group on the Home tab). Then, choose Modify as shown in Figure A to launch the Modify Style dialog. If you thumb through the default properties, you'll not find a numbering scheme (Figure B). Click the Format button and choose Numbering as shown in Figure B. If necessary, click the Numbering tab. Choose the predefined scheme that's the best match for what you want (Figure C).

If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
You can add many of these items by using text variables. InDesign includes several preset variables, such as Creation Date and File Name. You can modify these variables, and you can create your own. For example, you can create a variable that displays the first use of a Heading paragraph style in the header or footer. Once you create or edit the variables you need, you assemble them on the master page to create your header and footer, and then you apply the master page to the appropriate document pages.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process. document numbering in publisher
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