I have been having an issue with adding automatic page numbering to my multipage document. After adding the numbering it is showing up behind my background and objects on the page. If the page is blank, the numbering works just fine. But if I have other images or objects on the page, it lingers behind them. No matter what I do, it will not move to front of the page/objects/images. If I try and group the numbering and the objects on the page to combine them on the same layer, the numbering disappears from all remaining pages but the one I am currently on. Any help would be appreciated.

Generating an automatic table of contents is explained in Book Design Made Simple on pages 240–244, and the process is just slightly different when you’re using the Book feature. Your table of contents will be included in your front matter document, so open that document and click Layout>Table of Contents to open your Table of Contents dialog box (see our example below). Note that at the bottom left of the dialog box, the box called Include Book Documents is checked. That is the only difference when working in a Book file!
Place the insertion point in the paragraph and choose Restart Numbering from the context menu or choose Type > Bulleted And Numbered Lists > Restart Numbering. In normal lists, this command assigns the number 1 (or letter A) to a paragraph and makes it the first paragraph in a list. In multi-level lists, this command assigns the first lower-level number to a nested paragraph.
Look at the three choices under Options. The choices are Insert blank pages, Insert one text box on each page, and Duplicate all objects on page (you will have the option of inserting a page number inside the rectangle to the right of this option). If you want insert all blank pages, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert blank pages. If you want insert one text box on each page, then click inside the small circle in front of Insert one text box on each page. If you want duplicate all objects on a certain page, then click inside the small circle in front of Duplicate all objects on page. You will then need to type a number of the page you want to duplicate inside the rectangle to the right of Duplicate all objects on page.
This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
Every time you save a document in Word, the information in the document properties is updated. Part of the information is a count of how many times the file has been saved. This is referred to as the revision number. You can insert the revision number in your documents and have it updated automatically, if you so desire. To insert the revision number in your document, follow these steps:
Now, select the relevant page icon in the Pages Panel which represents the page you want to set as the first page of the second section of your document. In this example, this is Page 7 (which is currently numbered as vii). As before, go to the drop-down menu in the Pages Panel and select Numbering & Section Options… to open the Numbering & Section Options window. Again, check Start Page Numbering at, and from the Style drop-down menu select 1, 2, 3, 4… from the options available. Click OK.
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.

Thanks for asking, but if you haven't done the Google search I suggested in post 1 of this thread and practiced with any of the tutorials at the linked resources there, or those recommended in posts 2 and 6, please do. Perhaps someone on the list will do the work you're requesting. As a trainer I feel my best value is to offer paths to solutions so folks can learn to use the tools. Some tools require more practice, but those are the ones that give the most pleasure of discovery at the "Aha!" moment that comes when one "gets it."


Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
Do not let me lead you into a headache under false pretences: this FAQ is not going to tell you how to fix a document that contains broken numbering. It simply explains how the numbering works: this is valuable information if you work with Word a lot, and by understanding it, you can often work out how to fix a document. However, this FAQ is not going to tell you how.  (For a discussion of methods, see: List Restart Methods).
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.
Tip: Page numbers are printed on the top or bottom line in the text area of the page, not in the margin space. WordPerfect inserts a blank line to separate the page number from the rest of the document text. This reduces the amount of text that would normally fit on the page by two lines. If you decrease your top or bottom margin (depending on where you put the page numbers) to approximately 2/3 inch, you can regain the lost space, and the page numbers will appear to print in the margin space.
If you go into Print Preview, the field will automatically update in the Headers or Footers. Unfortunately, if you also have the field in the main document, (for example, in the coversheet), going into Print Preview won't update it – but printing will, provided that you have Update Fields ticked under Tools + Options + Print. You can also update the field by selecting it and pressing F9. Or you can press Ctrl+A followed by F9 to update all the fields in the main document in one go.

If PickleRick's answer doesn't work for you, then you probably have some sort of setting activated in your document which tells InDesign to create a new section when you use a different master page. I don't want to complicate things unnecessarily, so I am not posting instructions about that here, but let us know if you try implementing this solution and it doesn't seem to work and we can help you continue to problem solve (if you do so, it would be really helpful for us to see a screenshot of your pages panel). – magerber Aug 8 '17 at 17:42
Tip: WordPerfect uses the font set in the Document Default Font dialog box (accessible from File > Document > Default Font) for page numbers, which may or may not match the font that you selected in the document. There are two ways to prevent a conflict with the fonts. You can set the font that you want for both the body text and the page numbers in the Document Default Font dialog box. Or, you can format the page number font to match the body text font. In the Select Page Numbering Format dialog box, chooseFont to open the Page Numbering Font dialog box. Select the font that matches the one you’ve used in the document. Choose OK.

Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.
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