With the numbered paragraphs shown above, there is no extra spacing between the paragraphs. That’s easy to fix. Go ahead and type out at least part of your first numbered paragraph, then go to the Page Layout tab and adjust the value of Spacing After in the Paragraph section. Still no extra space? There’s one more setting to check. Click the launcher arrow in the lower right-hand corner to go to the Paragraph dialog box, uncheck the box next to “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style.” Click OK. That paragraph and all the remaining numbered ones will have more breathing room.
Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
The creator of ShaunaKelly.com, Shauna Kelly, passed away peacefully on Wednesday November 16, 2011 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. If you are requesting permission to re-use any information on this site, then you may do so with appropriate acknowledgement of her work. If her words, thoughts or pictures have helped you, or made money for you, then please consider making a donation in her name to the Women's Cancer Foundation.
Note that the list name remains the same for all of these tags. Table titles have a level 4 designation, and Figure titles have a level 5. The numbering style calls out the level 4 numbers (^4) on the Table titles, and the level 5 numbers (^5) for the Figure titles. It’s important to note that for this style, both of these restart after the level 3s (Subhead 2s).
You can define a section prefix to label section pages automatically. For example, if you specify A– for Section Prefix on page 16 of a document and include the section prefix, the page will appear in the table of contents or index as A–16. Text you type for a section marker appears when you choose Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Section Marker.

If you’ve already created separate InDesign files for your chapters, you can combine them using the Book feature just fine as long as they all have the same trim size. Books look better when margins and styles are consistent throughout, but it’s not a requirement. The Book feature will allow you to synchronize styles throughout all your booked documents, but again, it’s not a requirement, and it doesn’t happen automatically.


Each section within an InDesign document can be numbered differently. This allows you to use one type of numerals to consecutively number a document's preface or other introductory materials and another numeral system for the remainder of the document. You must first define your document's sections, and then you can add section markers or page markers to your master pages. Apply the master page to document pages to include the section and page numbers on the document pages.
If you would like the page number placed in a different location, open the Position list box and choose another option. Notice how the preview pages are updated to show you how the page number will look on the printed page. Choose OK to insert the page number code. This code will be automatically updated with the correct page number, no matter how many pages you add or subtract from the document
Finally, open each remaining document in your Book file, go to the Pages panel, click on the thumbnail image of the first page of the document to highlight it, then click Numbering & Section Options in the Pages fly-out menu. Select Automatic Page Numbering at the top, and arabic numerals in the Page Numbering Style drop-down menu, as shown below, and click OK.

A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
With the numbered paragraphs shown above, there is no extra spacing between the paragraphs. That’s easy to fix. Go ahead and type out at least part of your first numbered paragraph, then go to the Page Layout tab and adjust the value of Spacing After in the Paragraph section. Still no extra space? There’s one more setting to check. Click the launcher arrow in the lower right-hand corner to go to the Paragraph dialog box, uncheck the box next to “Don’t add space between paragraphs of the same style.” Click OK. That paragraph and all the remaining numbered ones will have more breathing room.
Hello Betsy, I have never heard of any kind of limit on the number of pages in a book. However, once a book gets too big it’s harder to find a good binding to hold it together, and it’s harder to pick the book up. If you’re thinking of anything longer than maybe 3000 pages, you should talk with a printer about proper binding, good thin paper, etc. to make it usable. And consider dividing it all into separate volumes.

Michelle Castle began writing professionally in 2005. She has written technology news and tutorials for consumers, brochure and web copy for the Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation, and promotional materials for religious nonprofits including the International Pentecostal Holiness Church. Michelle has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Oklahoma State University.
While InDesign veterans may assume everyone already knows this, I can assure you I have worked with very sophisticated documents from designers who did not take advantage of this basic feature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind as you tackle InDesign challenges is this: If it’s repetitious, tedious, or time-consuming, there’s probably a built-in solution right there in the program. You just need to go look for it.
To modify the options, click the Multilevel List option (in the Paragraph Group). Word selects all lists currently in use in the List Library. You'll see two options below the gallery: Define New Multilevel List and Define New List Style. Use the first to create and save a stable custom list style. You'll use the second to change list styles. You can also use the latter to create a new style. So, what's the difference? The Define New List Style option lets you name a style, so you can share, modify, and delete it later. Most users will never need this option. Now, let's move on: choose Define New Multilevel List. Figure D shows the resulting dialog.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process.
To package your book, first select all the documents in your Book file by clicking the first document, pressing Shift, and clicking the last document. Now click the fly-out menu at the top of the Book panel, and choose Package Book for Print. InDesign will take a moment to gather all the info it needs, then you’ll see a Package dialog box (click Package after resolving any warnings), a Printing Instructions dialog box (click Continue), and finally the Package Publication dialog box (see below), where you’ll choose a file name and place to save your packaged folder, and then click Package.
Choose the predefined scheme that's most similar to what you want. For instance, if you want sublevels indented, choose the indented form; similarly, if you don't want sublevels indented, choose the flush left form, as shown in Figure C. Try to make the best choice right now because changing your mind later will present so many problems that starting over will be easier.
I answer readers' questions about Microsoft Office when I can, but there's no guarantee. When contacting me, be as specific as possible. For example, "Please troubleshoot my workbook and fix what's wrong" probably won't get a response, but "Can you tell me why this formula isn't returning the expected results?" might. Please mention the app and version that you're using. I'm not reimbursed by TechRepublic for my time or expertise, nor do I ask for a fee from readers. You can contact me at susansalesharkins@gmail.com.
Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.
Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
You can control whether your next paragraph number continues the current sequence or starts again at 1 within that same right-click menu. If one of your numbers gets out of sequence, simply right-click and choose Continue Numbering. If you want to force the number back to the beginning (say, you’re switching from interrogatories to requests for production), choose Set Numbering Value (which will also give you the option of continuing the previous list).
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:

A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
My quick process involves setting up a row of plaques with a01, a02, a03, thru a09. Then copy the plaques to the clipboard. Run the REPLACE TEXT feature to replace "a" with "1". Move row down and paste clipboard back into page. Run REPLACE TEXT to replace "a" with "2". Repeat until I get all the numbers. It's faster than manually typing the numbers in but I know there's go to be someway of automating the process. document numbering in publisher
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