If PickleRick's answer doesn't work for you, then you probably have some sort of setting activated in your document which tells InDesign to create a new section when you use a different master page. I don't want to complicate things unnecessarily, so I am not posting instructions about that here, but let us know if you try implementing this solution and it doesn't seem to work and we can help you continue to problem solve (if you do so, it would be really helpful for us to see a screenshot of your pages panel). – magerber Aug 8 '17 at 17:42
Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.
You’ll be gathering several InDesign documents into one Book file to create a book. If you’re just getting started on your chapters, it’s best to design one of your more complex chapters first, then use that chapter as a template for all the remaining ones (i.e., “Save As” Chapter 1, delete all the original chapter’s text, place the Chapter 1 text, and thereby leave the trim size, margins, and styles intact and consistent among all chapters).

You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.


Hello Betsy, I have never heard of any kind of limit on the number of pages in a book. However, once a book gets too big it’s harder to find a good binding to hold it together, and it’s harder to pick the book up. If you’re thinking of anything longer than maybe 3000 pages, you should talk with a printer about proper binding, good thin paper, etc. to make it usable. And consider dividing it all into separate volumes.
You can't use Word's Numbering feature to generate a multilevel numbering system, even if you use built-in heading styles. Figure A shows a document with two styled heading levels: Heading 1 and Heading 2. You can apply the Numbering option (in the Paragraph group) and Word will number the headings consequently, but the feature ignores different levels; if you expected 1, 1.1, 2, 2.1, and 2.2, you might be surprised. If you select the entire document first, Numbering not only ignores the different levels, but it also numbers the paragraphs!
This feature is easiest to use when you combine it with Word's built-in heading styles. However, you can map a custom heading style to the multilevel numbering feature—it just takes more work. Word handles nine levels, but any document with more than four levels should receive a serious developmental edit. More than four becomes confusing and perhaps worse, unreadable.
InDesign allows you to add a page number marker to a master page within the document. The master page functions as a template for every page it's applied to, so the consecutive page numbers appear on every page. InDesign updates the page number automatically as you insert, delete and move pages. To add a page number marker to a master page, create a text box on the master page by going to the Type menu and choosing "Insert Special Character," "Markers" and then "Current Page Number."
    Numbering raffle tickets can be a rough project to tackle without the right tools. Luckily you can number raffle tickets or any other document or form with a desktop publishing software program you may already own like Microsoft Word, Publisher, Adobe Indesign or CorelDraw or any desktop publishing software that has a mail merge function.  Then all that is needed is a program that can create the mail merge file you need to number your tickets like starting number, ending number, prefix and so on. And for that program we suggest Number-Pro.

Thanks for the head start on this, it got me part the way through my problem but I found that when I had 3 figures in a row then a map, the next figure would jump back to #.1 again. Because I had figures, maps and tables that needed to be numbered I used the ‘levels’ to differentiate between them as you suggested, but found if you create a new number list for each entry ie. number list for maps, and number list for tables etc then they don’t conflict. thanks for the start off though. no where else pointed it out as clearly as this. Cheers
Remember that you must update the values in the sheet if you want to continue the numbering series with the next batch of tickets. For instance, if you want your next batch of tickets to start with 112, you'd open the workbook and change the value 100 to 112, and update the remaining values accordingly. Don't forget to save the workbook after updating the values.
Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. A Current Page Number marker must be set on pages in order to use this feature. The Current Page Number is a special character inserted in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended) where the page number will appear, by selecting Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number.
There are lots of options. For instance, you might reduce the amount of space between the number and the text by changing the Text indent at setting. Or, you might center the heading by choosing Center from the Number alignment dropdown. For even more options, click More to expose several more settings. You could use the Apply changes to option when setting level 1 to the I, II, III numbering style instead of changing it for each level.
This is how our document looks. It’s 16 pages long and has page numbers applied to it, as in Step 1, throughout. You can see that the main text of the book starts on Page 7 of the document, and that the page number marker has adjusted accordingly to mark this as 7. But we want this to be numbered as 1 in the book instead. So, let’s discover how to do just that.
One of the last things we need to do is our Table of Contents. We did this earlier, where we had different page numbering. So, all we need to do now is, because we've redefined all our Styles, and we're doing it all proper now, if we go to 'Layout'-- I've got my cursor flashing in here, first of all go to 'Layout', let's go to 'Update Table of Contents', and I'm going to click 'OK'. There's some spaces left in the front of this when I was messing around with it before, yours should be fine. So it's updated to the correct numbers. One thing I also did was I went in and adjusted the font from Medium to Light because I just liked it. I did that in between tutorials.
Let’s say you want to use roman numerals for the introductory pages, arabic numbers for the main body and lowercase letters for the closing pages. Each of these formats can be selected in the Page Numbering Format dialog box. First, position the insertion point where you want to start using a different page number format. Choose Format > Page > Numbering. In the Page Numbering Format list box, select a format, and then choose OK to insert the page number.
If you need to apply numbering within a paragraph rather than to the entire paragraph, you use Word's ListNum feature. Using the ListNum feature will allow you to take advantage of the numbering system you're currently using in your document (it will use the one you implemented most recently if you're not currently using a numbering system). The ListNum Field is available in Word 97 and later and interacts with multi-level list numbering (which should be linked to styles as set forth here). Here is a brief explanation of differences between the ListNum field and the Seq field.
In bulleted lists, each paragraph begins with a bullet character. In numbered lists, each paragraph begins with an expression that includes a number or letter and a separator such as a period or parenthesis. The numbers in a numbered list are updated automatically when you add or remove paragraphs in the list. You can change the type of bullet or numbering style, the separator, the font attributes and character styles, and the type and amount of indent spacing.
InDesign is a popular publishing software application released by Adobe. It is often used by graphic designers to publish books, magazines and brochures. Along with important elements like text, graphics and logos, page numbers are essential to these publications. It is possible to add the page numbers during or after the document's completion, if you know where to look. This article will tell you how to add page numbers in InDesign.

Defined lists are often used to track paragraphs for numbering purposes. When you create a paragraph style for numbering, you can assign the style to a defined list, and paragraphs are numbered in that style according to where they appear in the defined list. The first paragraph to appear is given number 1 (“Table 1”), for example, and the next paragraph is given number 2 (“Table 2”), even if it appears several pages later. Because both paragraphs belong to the same defined list, they can be numbered consecutively no matter how far apart they are in the document or book.
The first step is to decide if you want to include a label with the number. For example, you might want the word “Chapter” to appear before the actual chapter number. If you want to include a label, type it in the Custom Page Numbering Format text box. Next, select a numbering style from one of the list boxes, and click the Insert in Format button to insert the numbering code in the Custom Page Numbering Format text box.
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
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