One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
You probably know about Word's mail merge feature, and you might even use it to print labels or other documents, where some of the information changes (such as form letters). You can use the same feature with Publisher. Although you might not think of Publisher as an Office app, it comes with several different versions of Office. In this article, I'll show you how to print sequentially numbered tickets using Publisher and Excel. This article provides instructions for Publisher 2007, 2010, and 2013.
Well, no, I didn’t say that I’ve been trying to use chapter numbers. What I’ve been saying is that I’m trying to insert new SECTION numbers. Because according to the official site, InDesign only allows a single chapter per document. For this reason, InDesign offers the workaround of placing and renewing the section marker in multiple locations, even if the word before it is “Chapter”.

InDesign’s Book feature can be handy! Let’s say you’re working on a book with lots of images and/or chapters. And the file sizes are enormous. In fact, they are so big that you thought it would be smart to divide the book into separate documents for parts or chapters. That’s exactly what we did with Book Design Made Simple. It was more convenient for us to swap smaller sections back and forth than to send the entire book each time. All the parts or chapters were linked together at the end using InDesign’s Book feature. So this blog post explains how to create a Book file, or as we call it, “book” a book.

     One of the most profitable products a small print shop can produce is Raffle Tickets. But the trouble is most small to medium sized print shops either don't have a numbering unit or it is not setup to number multiple documents on a single sheet of paper. Most print shops do however have a laserjet or multi purpose printer. Combine that with some graphic software like Publisher and and easy to use numbering software program and you can capture the raffle ticket business and not let it slip away from you.
Check the Restart Numbering After option, if you want sublevel numbers to start at 1. In most cases, you'll want to set the After option to the previous heading, as shown in Figure F. Doing so forces Word to start renumbering Heading 2 paragraphs after each new Heading 1 paragraph. In other words, when Heading 1 updates to 2, the sublevel number will start over at 1, generating 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and so on.
To “manually” insert a page number, position the insertion point where you want the page number to appear, and then choose Format > Page > Insert Page Number. In the Insert Page Number dialog box (see Figure 2), the Page option is already selected, so you simply choose Insert to insert the page number. Notice that you can also use this dialog box to insert chapter or volume numbers.

A defined list can be interrupted by other paragraphs and lists, and can span different stories and different documents in a book. For example, use defined lists to create a multi-level outline, or to create a running list of numbered table names throughout your document. You can also define lists for separately numbered or bulleted items that are mixed together. For example, in a list of questions and answers, define one list for numbering the questions and another for numbering the answers.


In this situation I would suggest using an Alternate Layout. Once the content is final, choose Create Alternate Layout from the Pages panel menu. Make sure to create the new layout the same size and orientation as the original and then use the Numbering and Section Options dialog to specify the numbering required for the second catalog. The Print dialog will then let you select which layout to print.
There may be instances in your Adobe InDesign documents that you want to change the start page, by default the numbering starts at page one on the first page of your document but if you right click on for example page 2 you can select ‘Numbering and section options’ then you can click the button ‘Start page numbering at’ then type ‘2’ in to the box. this will snow start a new section on page two which will make page 2’s page number actually page 1. You can start new page numbering sections anywhere in your Adobe InDesign document. 
Place the insertion point in the paragraph and choose Restart Numbering from the context menu or choose Type > Bulleted And Numbered Lists > Restart Numbering. In normal lists, this command assigns the number 1 (or letter A) to a paragraph and makes it the first paragraph in a list. In multi-level lists, this command assigns the first lower-level number to a nested paragraph.

We'll work with the existing heading styles. When applying this technique to your own documents, you can modify the heading styles to reflect the properties you need—you're not stuck with the default settings. If, however, the built-in heading styles are already in use because you're working with an existing document, you'll have to create new styles. Avoid this route when possible. We'll be changing properties for the numbering scheme and not the actual heading styles.
There are three settings we need to embed in this field. The first is to tell it what kind of numbering we want to do (in this case, “First, Second, Third”), what case we want to use (upper case, title case, etc.), and a switch to tell Microsoft Word to increment the numbers. Click each of these settings as shown below, being sure to click Add to Field after each one:
See Word's Numbering Explained by John McGhie, MVP - comprehensive and not pretty (Downloadable pdf file in letter size) - Reading this is vital to anyone attempting to use automatic numbering or bullets in a law office setting or other places where the documents are likely to be reused or heavily edited. See also How to Create a Template with a downloadable template with style-based numbering.
In summary, paragraph numbering is really just an exercise in logic, and this blog post is showing the numbering styles for a very specific project. Your project may be similar, but not exactly the same. You just need to think though the levels and how you want to restart the numbers. I do my best to think it through correctly the first time, set it up, and then try as hard as I can to break it, so that I can find my errors. The good news is that once you get your numbers working, you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.

The steps in this article are going to show you how to add page numbers to the pages of your Publisher document. The page number will appear on every page of your document, at the location that you choose. Note that page numbers will also be included on any new pages that you add after inserting the page numbers, and they will update automatically if you delete any of the existing pages from the document.
Over the last few months, we've reviewed Word's numbered list features. Specifically, How to control spacing and alignment in a numbered list in Microsoft Word shows how to control spacing and alignment and How to number headings in a Word 2016 document shows a simple way to number headings. In this article, we'll continue by reviewing Word's Multilevel List feature. Fortunately, it's easier to implement and modify than you might think.
I have been having an issue with adding automatic page numbering to my multipage document. After adding the numbering it is showing up behind my background and objects on the page. If the page is blank, the numbering works just fine. But if I have other images or objects on the page, it lingers behind them. No matter what I do, it will not move to front of the page/objects/images. If I try and group the numbering and the objects on the page to combine them on the same layer, the numbering disappears from all remaining pages but the one I am currently on. Any help would be appreciated.
Notice that the Font option (when you applied italics) changes only the number, not the heading text. To update the heading text, modify the heading style as you normally would. Word assumes you want all Heading 1 and Heading 2 styles included in the new numbering scheme. If you want to omit a heading level from the scheme, don't use a built-in heading style to format those headings.

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Understanding outline numbering and how outline numbering interacts with styles is crucial to your success in using Word with legal documents. Basic outline numbering can be handled much the same way as bullets and numbering. Seven default outline numbered lists come with Word. Three of the lists format the paragraphs with outline numbers. These lists are in the top row of the dialog box. The remaining four format the paragraphs with outline numbers and apply heading styles to the paragraphs and can be found in the bottom row.
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