A request for numbering headings in a new document doesn't have to elicit terror—it only sounds ghoulish. If you're good with styles, you might consider a custom numbered list style, but that's too much work. Instead, use Word's built-in heading styles for a painless process. My best advice is to get the numbering scheme in place before you create the document. Trying to number headings in an existing document really can cause nightmares!
A single InDesign document can contain up to 9,999 pages, but page numbers can be as large as 999,999. (For example, you can correctly number a 100‑page document that starts on page 9,949.) By default, the first page is a recto (right) page numbered 1. Odd-numbered pages always appear on the right; if you use the Section Options command to change the first page number to an even number, the first page becomes a verso (left) page.
Word automatically formats text as a numbered list when you when you type a number and a period followed by a space: Word adds a tab and creates a ¼-inch hanging indent. (If the paragraphs already have hanging indents, the original settings are preserved.) The quickest way to create a custom numbered list is to change the formatting of an existing (or automatically created) list.

InDesign is a popular publishing software application released by Adobe. It is often used by graphic designers to publish books, magazines and brochures. Along with important elements like text, graphics and logos, page numbers are essential to these publications. It is possible to add the page numbers during or after the document's completion, if you know where to look. This article will tell you how to add page numbers in InDesign.

The page number feature in WordPerfect® is very comprehensive. You can start by inserting a basic page number and progress to creating customized page numbers that include chapter and volume numbers. You can also create a custom page number with a combination of these numbers. For example, you might create a page number that shows the current page and the chapter number, or the current page and the total number of pages (also called “page x of y”).
Tip  Follow the same steps (above) to create Request for Production or Request for Admissions. The only difference would be in Step 3, you would change the "rog" to "rpf" or "rfa". This will keep unique numbering schemes running in the same document. Therefore, you could have an Interrogatory No.1 as well as Request for Production No.1. Keep in mind that if you cut, copy or paste sequence codes, you'll need to select them and press F9 to update the field codes. They do not update automatically.
An InDesign document can only have one chapter, and these chapters are typically combined in an InDesign book. To insert a chapter number, create a text frame where you want the chapter number to appear on either a document or master page. Click on the "Type" menu, then "Text Variables," "Insert Text Variable" and then "Chapter Number." Update the chapter number if necessary to keep your chapter numbers consecutive by clicking on "Numbering & Section Options" in the Layout menu.
This video gives an overview of how to use Corel Draw and layout and number raffle tickets using Number Pro to create the data file for the numbers needed. This video covers how to import a data file previously created with number pro and positioning the numbers on the raffle ticket file that was also created prior and imported as an image file. To learn how to create a data file with the raffle ticket numbers you want to use - check out http://www.number-pro.com or search for How To Use Number-Pro here on youtube. As always more info can be found at http://www.number-pro.com
There are two ways to number the pages using the Book feature: manually or automatically. If you’ve set the starting page number in each document manually, those page numbers will appear in your Book file. There are, however, advantages to numbering your pages automatically. For example, say you decide to add a few pages to a chapter, or change your mind about the order of the chapters. With automatic page numbering, your Book file will adjust the page numbers accordingly whenever you make changes that affect the page numbering.
The values for Number position (here called Aligned at), Text indent and Follow number with are in the Position section at the bottom. With multi-level numbering, you also have easy access to settings that control the type of numbering at each level, the characters before and after each level’s numbers (period versus parenthesis), and the list number style (1, a, I, etc.).
Note: If you are a developer, you would do much better to use a Document Variable rather than a Document Property (so that the user can't update the version without using your macros); and to write a version control macro assigned to an “Update Version” button to take care of updating the document variable, the “Last  Updated Date”, the revision history and the document's filename (and the filepath, if you have an archive strategy for old versions), as well as taking care of transitions between draft and live status. However, that is outside the scope of this article.
Tip: A “page x of y” page number tells you the number of the current page (x) and the total number of pages in the document (y). To create a “page x of y” page number, select Page 1 of 1 in the Page Numbering Format list box. (Note that if you have more than one page in your document when you insert or change the page numbers, the “Page 1 of 1” option may appear in the dialog box as “Page 1 of 2,” “Page 2 of 5,” and so on, depending on the current page and the total number of pages.).
All of this happens in the Bullets & Numbering dialog box, shown below. You will definitely want to use paragraph styles for this. My first one is called Chapter title. You will need to begin by changing the List Type to Numbers for all of the levels, and you must both name the List and use the same named list for all Levels. You do this by selecting the List > New List.
Since Word 2000 applies outline numbering by default, as you press TAB or SHIFT+TAB in a numbered list, you are moved to the next or previous outline level. If you are in a numbered list that has outline numbering generated by the method described in the previous exercise, when you choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu (or alternate-click a portion of the numbered list), the Numbered tab appears on the Bullets and Numbering dialog box. However, if you first select the entire list and choose Bullets and Numbering from the Format menu, the Outline Numbered tab from the Bullets and Numbering dialog box is selected.
The Suppress feature is designed to prevent headers, footers, watermarks, and page numbers from printing on a particular page. Suppress is frequently used to keep these items from printing on a title page. Simply insert a Suppress code at the top of every page on which you do not want a page number to print. That’s it! The page numbers will appear on every page except those pages with Suppress codes.
Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. A Current Page Number marker must be set on pages in order to use this feature. The Current Page Number is a special character inserted in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended) where the page number will appear, by selecting Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number.

Actually the Numbering & Section Options are not available in the Master page setup which is where the page numbering was set (so that I can have the chapter number appear on all odd-numbered pages). The Numbering & Section Options are, however, available on the normal pages. So that’s where I’ve set the automatic numbering, but of course nothing changes — the book is chapter 1 throughout. As for the setting in the “book panel”, this is something I can’t find. I don’t appear to have a “book panel”. I do have pages panel that seems to fit the description, but there is no add-document setting.
The Suppress feature is designed to prevent headers, footers, watermarks, and page numbers from printing on a particular page. Suppress is frequently used to keep these items from printing on a title page. Simply insert a Suppress code at the top of every page on which you do not want a page number to print. That’s it! The page numbers will appear on every page except those pages with Suppress codes.
Next double-click your document for Chapter 1 in the Book file to open it. In your Chapter 1 document, you’ll manually start the page numbering at page 1, and switch from lowercase roman numerals to arabic numerals. So go to the Pages panel, click on the thumbnail image of the first page of the document to highlight it, then click Numbering & Section Options in the Pages fly-out menu. Select Start Page Numbering at, and type 1 in the adjoining box. Then select arabic numerals in the Page Numbering Style drop-down menu, as shown below. Click OK, and all the pages in the document will now be numbered with arabic numerals starting with number 1.
Notice that the Font option (when you applied italics) changes only the number, not the heading text. To update the heading text, modify the heading style as you normally would. Word assumes you want all Heading 1 and Heading 2 styles included in the new numbering scheme. If you want to omit a heading level from the scheme, don't use a built-in heading style to format those headings.
InDesign’s automatic page numbers work well enough, but what about special cases? Some documents require pages to be omitted from total page counts. Other documents use several different systems. Sometimes section numbers or special codes must be included. Well, don’t start typing in those numbers manually, because InDesign can handle it—and quite gracefully, too.
Raffle Ticket and Event Ticket NumberingRaffle ticket numbering can be easy and give you a larger array of products to offer your customers.     Besides the printer, and software you will need a paper cutter and perforator if you are going to offer a ticket with a stub. For a small table top machine that is affordable I would recommend the unit below. This is adjustable and allows for multi perforations and scoring in one pass.
InDesign’s Book feature can be handy! Let’s say you’re working on a book with lots of images and/or chapters. And the file sizes are enormous. In fact, they are so big that you thought it would be smart to divide the book into separate documents for parts or chapters. That’s exactly what we did with Book Design Made Simple. It was more convenient for us to swap smaller sections back and forth than to send the entire book each time. All the parts or chapters were linked together at the end using InDesign’s Book feature. So this blog post explains how to create a Book file, or as we call it, “book” a book.
If you’re a self-taught InDesign user, you may not have been introduced to automatic page numbering, one of the biggest time-saving features in the program. InDesign allows you to set up the page numbering feature in your Master Pages. Then, as you add or shuffle pages, InDesign updates individual page numbers accordingly. You can style the page number any way you like.
You’ll see in the Book file shown below that the left column contains a symbol in one of the rows called Indicates the Style Source. It means that the document in that row contains the styles that govern all the documents in the Book file if you choose to synchronize the styles. Synchronizing styles using the Book feature will synchronize your paragraph styles, character styles, object styles, and color swatches.
A multi-level list is a list that describes hierarchical relationships between the list paragraphs. These lists are also called outline lists because they resemble outlines. The list’s numbering scheme (as well as indentations) show rank as well as how items are subordinate to one another. You can tell where each paragraph fits in the list with respect to the paragraphs before and after it. You can include up to nine levels in a multi-level list.
One of the easiest ways to begin applying numbers is by starting to type a numbered list. Word recognizes that you are creating a list and responds accordingly by converting text that you type into numbered items. The number scheme, delimiter characters that mark the beginning or end of a unit of data and formatting are all based on what you have typed.
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