Note: If you are a developer, you would do much better to use a Document Variable rather than a Document Property (so that the user can't update the version without using your macros); and to write a version control macro assigned to an “Update Version” button to take care of updating the document variable, the “Last  Updated Date”, the revision history and the document's filename (and the filepath, if you have an archive strategy for old versions), as well as taking care of transitions between draft and live status. However, that is outside the scope of this article.
A quick way to create a bulleted or numbered list is to type the list, select it, and then click the Bulleted List or Numbered List button in the Control panel. These buttons let you turn the list on or off and switch between bullets and numbers. You can also make bullets and numbering part of a paragraph style and construct lists by assigning styles to paragraphs.
The heading here could be anything: affirmative defenses in an answer, articles in a contract, etc. It doesn’t matter; the technique is the same with only slight variations. The result is that you’ll have a heading saved in your Quick Parts that will be numbered correctly, no matter how many items you add or delete. This makes this technique particularly useful in building templates for common documents; because it’s always easier to delete than add, they’ll re-number themselves after editing.
Hello Betsy, I have never heard of any kind of limit on the number of pages in a book. However, once a book gets too big it’s harder to find a good binding to hold it together, and it’s harder to pick the book up. If you’re thinking of anything longer than maybe 3000 pages, you should talk with a printer about proper binding, good thin paper, etc. to make it usable. And consider dividing it all into separate volumes.
A request for numbering headings in a new document doesn't have to elicit terror—it only sounds ghoulish. If you're good with styles, you might consider a custom numbered list style, but that's too much work. Instead, use Word's built-in heading styles for a painless process. My best advice is to get the numbering scheme in place before you create the document. Trying to number headings in an existing document really can cause nightmares!
First thing we need to do, is we need to jump to page 1. So double click page 1, so we know we're on it. Right click page no.1, and we need to go to this option that says 'Numbering & Section Options'. Click on him. And what we do is, we say, I want to switch it from style 1, 2, 3 to A, B, C. Actually you pick any of these in here. It's really typical to use A, B, C, but you can use any of these other numbers, just click 'OK'. You'll notice that A, B, C, D, E is being replaced out. Now what we want to do is go to our first page that we want. In our case it's E. So I don't want this. Let's get rid of our Spreads. I don't want page 1, page C, or B. I don't want this to be page1, I want this to be page 1. So I'm going to double click page E. Right click it, go to 'Numbering & Sectioning'. And just say, I'd like to start at page no. 1 using this format. Click 'OK'. What will happen is, you can see, page 1 starts here, 2, 3, 4. You see, the numbering starts here as well. All the way through, to the end of our document.
Select the text frame with the Selection Tool (V, Escape) and go to Edit > Copy and Edit > Paste. Manoeuvre this second text frame onto the left-hand page in a mirrored position. InDesign will provide pop-up guidelines once the text frame lines up exactly with the frame on the right-hand page. Once your happy with the positioning, select the Type Tool (T) and adjust the orientation of the text to Align Left from the Character Formatting Controls panel, as before.
At this point, you could click OK and start your document. But, let's modify the scheme instead. Click the Define New Number Format button. In the resulting dialog, click the Font button and choose Chiller from the Font list and click OK (only once). Click inside the Number format control—to the left of the example character—and enter Heading, as shown in Figure D. Click OK twice. If you check the properties now (Figure B), you'll find a numbering scheme. Click OK once more to return to the document. Heading 1 in the Styles Quick Gallery displays the new numbering scheme.
Determine what kind of numbering you want to use for your document or book. For long documents, you can assign chapter numbers. Each document can be assigned only one chapter number. If you want to use different numbering within a document, you can define ranges of pages as sections; these sections can be numbered differently. For example, the first ten pages of a document (the front matter) might use Roman numerals, and the rest of the document might use Arabic numerals.
It sure is possible! Numbering and Section options are available in the Pages Panel menu. These options allow you to define what page starts a section and how it should be numbered. Insert a Current Page Number marker (Type>Insert Special Character>Markers>Current Page Number) in a text frame on a page or master page (recommended), select the first page of your section, open the Numbering and Section Options dialog, and enter 200 in the Start Page Numbering at: field. Hope this helps!
Well, no, I didn’t say that I’ve been trying to use chapter numbers. What I’ve been saying is that I’m trying to insert new SECTION numbers. Because according to the official site, InDesign only allows a single chapter per document. For this reason, InDesign offers the workaround of placing and renewing the section marker in multiple locations, even if the word before it is “Chapter”.
The process of setting up chapter and volume numbers is essentially the same as setting up page numbers. You can use these numbering elements as a way to keep track of any number of items. Yes, they are labeled “chapters” and “volumes,” but if you ignore the labels, you’ll see that you can keep track of any “section” in a document. In fact, if you count page numbers, chapter numbers, volume numbers, and secondary page numbers, you’ll see that you have four different numbering methods at your disposal.
First thing we need to do, is we need to jump to page 1. So double click page 1, so we know we're on it. Right click page no.1, and we need to go to this option that says 'Numbering & Section Options'. Click on him. And what we do is, we say, I want to switch it from style 1, 2, 3 to A, B, C. Actually you pick any of these in here. It's really typical to use A, B, C, but you can use any of these other numbers, just click 'OK'. You'll notice that A, B, C, D, E is being replaced out. Now what we want to do is go to our first page that we want. In our case it's E. So I don't want this. Let's get rid of our Spreads. I don't want page 1, page C, or B. I don't want this to be page1, I want this to be page 1. So I'm going to double click page E. Right click it, go to 'Numbering & Sectioning'. And just say, I'd like to start at page no. 1 using this format. Click 'OK'. What will happen is, you can see, page 1 starts here, 2, 3, 4. You see, the numbering starts here as well. All the way through, to the end of our document.
Place the insertion point in the paragraph and choose Restart Numbering from the context menu or choose Type > Bulleted And Numbered Lists > Restart Numbering. In normal lists, this command assigns the number 1 (or letter A) to a paragraph and makes it the first paragraph in a list. In multi-level lists, this command assigns the first lower-level number to a nested paragraph.
And what all did I forget to do? I forgot to go to 'Styles', 'Paragraph Styles', and I went, right click 'Redefine' because I've reverted to what it was before. So that's page numbering, we used A, B, C, D at the beginning. And we're going to use 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 for the rest of it. The only trouble happens, is when you go 'File', 'Print' now, and you're like, "Hmm." "I want to print pages." and you're not too sure. So what I have to do is go to A, through to 30. So it will include A, B, C, D, E, and all the way through the numbers. What if I just need A, B, or if I just print 1-30? It's going to skip out these first pages. That's just something to be aware of when you're printing, or making PDFs, that the page numbering is a little bit stranger now that we've gone and messed around with the page numbering.
publishing software and Number-ProCan I use a regular desktop printer for raffle ticket numbering? Absolutely!With desktop publishing software like Adobe InDesign, Microsoft Word, Publisher or any application that allows you to do a "merge" and a stand alone software application like Number-Pro (www.number-pro.com) you can print your own raffle tickets with numbering or any other document you want to be numbered.The ease of using Number-Pro is that it can be used with any software that allows a file merge. This includes but not limited to:Adobe Indesign
When you're working on a document such as a magazine or a book with many pages in it, using the master page feature in Adobe InDesign CC 2015 to insert automatic page numbering simplifies working with the document. On a master page, you designate the position, font, and size of the page numbers and any additional text you want to accompany the numbers such as the magazine name, date or the word "Page." Then that information appears on every page of the document along with the correct page number. As you work, you can add and remove pages or rearrange entire sections, and the numbers remain accurate.
The process of setting up chapter and volume numbers is essentially the same as setting up page numbers. You can use these numbering elements as a way to keep track of any number of items. Yes, they are labeled “chapters” and “volumes,” but if you ignore the labels, you’ll see that you can keep track of any “section” in a document. In fact, if you count page numbers, chapter numbers, volume numbers, and secondary page numbers, you’ll see that you have four different numbering methods at your disposal.

Raffle Ticket and Event Ticket NumberingRaffle ticket numbering can be easy and give you a larger array of products to offer your customers.     Besides the printer, and software you will need a paper cutter and perforator if you are going to offer a ticket with a stub. For a small table top machine that is affordable I would recommend the unit below. This is adjustable and allows for multi perforations and scoring in one pass.
Check the Restart Numbering After option, if you want sublevel numbers to start at 1. In most cases, you'll want to set the After option to the previous heading, as shown in Figure F. Doing so forces Word to start renumbering Heading 2 paragraphs after each new Heading 1 paragraph. In other words, when Heading 1 updates to 2, the sublevel number will start over at 1, generating 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and so on.
To include numbering prefixes from higher levels, enter text or click at the start of the Number box and choose Insert Number Placeholder and then select a Level option (for example, Level 1), or enter ^ and then the list level (for example, enter ^1). In a list with first levels numbered 1, 2, 3, and so on, and second levels numbered a, b, c, and so on, including the first-level prefix in the second level renders second-level numbers as 1a, 1b, 1c; 2a, 2b, 2c; 3a, 3b, 3c.
You can add a chapter number variable to your document. Like page numbers, chapter numbers can be updated automatically and formatted and styled as text. A chapter number variable is commonly used in documents that are part of a book. A document can have only one chapter number assigned to it; if you want to divide a single document into chapters, you can create sections instead.
You can insert page numbers on the current page, all pages, all odd pages, or all even pages. When you insert page numbers on multiple pages, a new master layer is automatically created, and the page number is placed on it. The master layer can be an all-page master layer, an odd-page master layer, or an even-page master layer. For more information about master layers, see Creating layers.

Each document in your book can be numbered, and these numbers can be used as automatic chapter numbers. Automatic will increment from the previous document’s number, or you can choose “Same as Previous in Book” if it’s still the same chapter but broken into two or more parts, or you can arbitrarily number it anything you want to. This can save time if you have a large number of chapters that change order frequently, since the numbers will update automatically.
Inserting page numbers into your InDesign document is quick and simple. The first thing to realise is that InDesign numbers pages according to the page numbers listed in the Pages Panel (Window > Pages). Unless you want to spend the time manually inserting individual page numbers to override this, you should understand how to define sections in your document (see Step 2, below).
Page numbering is set within each document (see Book Design Made Simple, page 245). To set your page numbering to automatic, start by opening the document containing your front matter. Your front matter will have a separate page numbering system from the rest of your book, using lowercase roman numerals. Go to the Pages panel, click on the thumbnail image of the first page to highlight it, then click Numbering & Section Options in the Pages fly-out menu. Select Automatic Page Numbering at the top, and lowercase roman numerals in the Page Numbering Style drop-down menu, as shown below. Click OK, and all the pages in the document will now be numbered with lowercase roman numerals starting with number i.
@MohanRajuM Repeating the same thing again isn't going to help. “Set page number for my catalogue” does not make sense in English; I don't understand what it's supposed to mean exactly. We don't normally talk about ‘setting’ a page number. Please explain in detail what it is you want to do. Are you talking about adding page numbers to every page in the document? Or are you talking about defining how the page number should be presented? Or something else entirely? – Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 8 '17 at 21:33
One solution is to format the heading with the style and follow it with a hidden paragraph mark. You should format the text in the next paragraph with a style that is not included in the Table of Contents. A hidden paragraph mark keeps the text together on one line when it is printed, even though it is actually two separate paragraphs. The Table of Contents command picks up only those paragraphs with heading styles and places them into the Table of Contents.
×